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Hochelaga Archipelago

The Hochelaga Archipelago, also known as the Montreal Islands, is a cluster of islands at the confluence of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence rivers in southwestern Quebec. It is estimated that the archipelago comprises about 300 islands and islets, of which the Island of Montreal is the largest. Like the Island of Montreal, the other three largest islands — Île Jésus (most of the City of Laval), Île Bizard and Île Perrot — are inhabited, while most of the smallest ones are not. Several of the islands that comprise the archipelago are protected by the Nature Conservancy of Canada. Though not originally part of the island chain, Île-Notre-Dame is a man-made island within the archipelago, and today is home to Montreal’s Parc Jean-Drapeau.

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Intergenerational Trauma and Residential Schools

Historical trauma occurs when trauma caused by historical oppression is passed down through generations. For more than 100 years, the Canadian government supported residential school programs that isolated Indigenous children from their families and communities (see Residential Schools in Canada). Under the guise of educating and preparing Indigenous children for their participation in Canadian society, the federal government and other administrators of the residential school system committed what has since been described as an act of cultural genocide. As generations of students left these institutions, they returned to their home communities without the knowledge, skills or tools to cope in either world. The impacts of their institutionalization in residential school continue to be felt by subsequent generations. This is called intergenerational trauma.

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Ottawa

Ottawa, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 934,243 (2016 c), 883,391 (2011 c). The City of Ottawa is the capital of Canada and is located on the Ottawa River on Ontario's eastern boundary with Québec, about 200 km west of Montréal. The name "Ottawa" is thought to derive from an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the same name, probably from a word meaning "to trade" (see Odawa). Amalgamation, on 1 January 2001, merged "old" Ottawa with 11 area municipalities and the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton to create a “new” city. The amalgamated city encompasses the municipalities of Ottawa, Vanier, Nepean, Kanata, Gloucester and Cumberland; the townships of Rideau, West Carleton, Goulbourn and Osgoode; and the village of Rockcliffe Park.

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Barkerville

Barkerville is a preserved and dynamic gold-rush town in the British Columbia interior. Each summer, its rich history during the Cariboo Gold Rush and subsequent gold mining in the area is demonstrated for visitors from all over the world.

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Gwaii Haanas

At 1,470 km2, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site (also known as Gwaii Haanas) encompasses 15 per cent of Haida Gwaii.

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Port-Royal National Historic Site

Located in Nova Scotia, Port-Royal National Historic Site features a reconstruction of the Port-Royal Habitation, one of the first settlements attempted by the French in North America (1605). Administered by Parks Canada, this historic site offers interpretive activities that convey the French settlers’ challenges in implementing the new colony. Visitors can also learn about the culture of the Mi’kmaq, the area’s first inhabitants of the land.

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Coffee houses

Cafés that presented folk, blues and, occasionally, pop and jazz musicians. Like the boîte à chansons that was unique to French Canada, the coffee house - often in a converted house, a storefront or a church basement - was characterized by its limited seating capacity (an average of less than 100), informality, and intimacy

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The Crest Theatre

The Crest Theatre was founded in 1953 by Donald and Murray DAVIS with the support of their sister, Barbara CHILCOTT. As students, in the late 1940s, Donald and Murray had studied theatre under Robert Gill at the University of Toronto's Hart House Theatre.

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Banks Island

Banks Island, 70 028 km2, fifth-largest island in Canada, is the westernmost island of the Arctic Archipelago.

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Moon

The dark grey lunar surface reflects only 7% of the sunlight it receives (comparable to the reflectivity of black soil). The moon is dominated by thousands of craters, ranging from microscopic pits to gigantic Clavius, diameter 230 km.

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Jonquière

As the industrial axis of the region, its history is closely tied to the history of major corporations, specifically to that of the Price Company Ltd (now Abitibi-Price Inc) and Alcan. An agricultural parish founded in 1847, Jonquière began developing after 1893 when the railway arrived.

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Kluane Ranges

Spruce forest is common below about 1200 m elevation, but the upper slopes of the ranges are treeless. The area supports an abundance of wildlife, including grizzly and BLACK BEAR, timber wolf, Dall sheep, mountain goat, caribou and moose.

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Toronto Feature: High Park

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

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Halifax

Halifax, Nova Scotia, incorporated as a city in 1841, population 403,131 (2016 c), 390,096 (2011 c). Halifax is the capital of Nova Scotia and the largest urban area in Atlantic Canada. On 1 April 1996 Halifax was amalgamated with neighbouring communities to form the Halifax Regional Municipal Government. Halifax Regional Municipality occupies a strategic and central location on the province's east coast and is one of the world's largest harbours. Sometimes called "Warden of the North" for its historic military role, today it is a major regional centre for Atlantic Canada's economy.

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Rebellion in Upper Canada

The 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada was a less violent, more limited affair than the uprising earlier that year in Lower Canada. However, its leaders, including William Lyon Mackenzie, were equally serious in their demands. They wanted democratic reform and an end to the rule of a privileged oligarchy. The rebellion itself failed, but its very failure helped pave the way for moderate and careful political change in British North America. This included the union of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada and the eventual introduction of responsible government.