Search for "black history"

Displaying 141-160 of 782 results
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Strathroy-Caradoc

During its early history Strathroy suffered a number of devastating fires. In 1868 a blaze wiped out a considerable portion of Strathroy's business section. Several fires in manufacturing plants in the late 1890s and an agricultural depression caused a period of economic downturn for the town.

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Trois-Rivières-Ouest

The history of Trois-Rivières-Ouest is linked with that of the city of Trois-Rivières. Set up as a parish municipality in 1855, it remained rural and semi-rural in character for many years, its population quite small in comparison with that of its neighbour.

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Coaticook

Like most localities in the Eastern Townships, the history of Coaticook starts out in English and ends up in French. The early pioneers were for the most part of American or British origin. The town's founder was Richard Baldwin, Sr, who built a house there in 1830.

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Parksville

Parksville, BC, incorporated as a city in 1986, population 11 977 (2011c), 10 993 (2006c). The City of Parksville is located on the east coast of VANCOUVER ISLAND, 35 km northwest of NANAIMO.

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Humboldt

Its designation as a railway divisional point fostered growth, as did the establishment of St Peters Colony (50 townships) by the Roman Catholic Order of St Benedict (1903).

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Lac Mistassini

Lac Mistassini, 2335 km2, elevation 372 m, max length 161 km and width 19 km, is located in central Québec, 360 km east of JAMES BAY and 220 km northwest of Lac SAINT-JEAN.

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Lighthouses

Before the automation of lighthouses, the duties of lighthouse keepers included the traditional "keeping of the light," maintaining radio communications and beacons, tending fog alarms and providing rescue services and sanctuary.

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Nova Scotia and Confederation

Nova Scotia was one of the four founding provinces of Canada. It joined New Brunswick,  Ontario and Quebec in Confederation on 1 July 1867. However, this was mainly because Confederation delivered the Intercolonial Railway to the Maritimes, and because of the efforts of Sir Charles Tupper. His government passed approval for Confederation in the colonial legislature despite popular opposition. (See Confederation’s Opponents.) Confederation was met with mass protests in the colony. Joseph Howe led a two-year effort to repeal the union. (See Repeal Movement.) But Howe finally decided he could do more to help his province by working inside the federal government. He joined the federal Cabinet in 1869.

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Sillery (Qué)

Sillery has a grand history dating back to the 17th century. It was the site of Canada's first Indian reserve and Jesuit mission, Sillery, on the edge of the St Lawrence. The reserve was funded by Noël Brulart de Sillery (1577-1640), for whom the town was named.

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Hebron Mission National Historic Site of Canada

For generations, Hebron, one of Nunatsiavut’s (see Labrador Inuit and Newfoundland and Labrador) most culturally important and significant sites, was an important meeting place for the Inuit, as well as a primary hunting and fishing area. In the early 1800s, Moravian missionaries chose the site to establish their fourth and northernmost mission in Labrador, officially opening the mission in 1830 (although missions were later established farther north, at Ramah in 1871 and Killinek in 1905). For more than 130 years, Hebron was a thriving community where an average of 200 to 250 Inuit lived. In 1959, without consultation with the Inuit, the community was closed, forcing all Inuit to relocate. Declared a National Historic Site in 1976 by the federal government, the Hebron Mission has been undergoing major restoration since 2004.

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Rocky Mountain Trench

The Rocky Mountain Trench is a long and deep valley extending approximately 1,500 km from the Bitterroot Valley in northwest Montana through British Columbia to the Liard Plain just south of the Yukon Territory. Its predominantly flat floor is 3–20 km wide and ranges in elevation between 600 m and 1,000 m above sea level. With walls made of sedimentary, volcanic and igneous rock, the Trench is sometimes referred to as the “Valley of a Thousand Peaks” because of the towering mountain ranges on either side: the Rocky Mountains to the east and the Columbia, Omineca and Cassiar mountains to the west. Humans have relied on the rich resources provided by this distinctive landscape from pre-colonial times to the present.

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Normandin

On 14 February 1979, the city of Normandin was created by the amalgamation of the village of Normandin and the parish of Normandin. However, its history began on 23 May 1733 when Joseph-Laurent Normandin was sent to survey this region and prepare a map of the lakes and rivers.

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Beauceville

The history of the Beauceville area goes back to 1737 when the Seigneury Rigaud de Vaudreuil, or Saint-François-de-la-Nouvelle-Beauce, was granted to François-Pierre de Rigaud de Vaudreuil (1703-79). The name Nouvelle-Beauce refers to the Beauce Region of France, famous for its wheat production.

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Selwyn Mountains

The northern Selwyn Mountains lie to the east of the Yukon-NWT border, and the southern section straddles the border south from the Macmillan Pass to the South Nahanni River.

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Thames River

The Thames River begins in a swampy area of southwestern Ontario and meanders quietly for 273 km past the cities of Woodstock, London and Chatham-Kent to empty into Lake St. Clair.

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Jasper National Park

Jasper National Park is a protected area located in the Rocky Mountains, about 370 km west of Edmonton, Alberta. Established in 1907, it was the fifth national park created in Canada. It’s also one of seven parks in the Rocky Mountains that make up the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage site (the others are Yoho, Banff and Kootenay national parks, and Mount Robson, Mount Assiniboine and Hamber provincial parks). Among the reasons for the UNESCO designation are the parks’ mountain landscapes, complete with waterfalls, canyons and glaciers, including those found in the Columbia Icefield.

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Geography of Manitoba

Manitoba is divided by three of Canada’s seven physiographic regions. These three regions are the Hudson Bay Lowland, the Canadian Shield and the  Interior Plains. Most of Manitoba’s population is concentrated in the southeastern corner of the province, in the Interior Plains physiographic region. This region is also where most of Manitoba’s arable land is located. By comparison, the Hudson Bay Lowland and the Canadian Shield are generally not suitable for agriculture. Churchill, Manitoba’s only saltwater port, is located in the Hudson Bay Lowland. Hydroelectric power, freshwater fishing, metal mines and some forestry are located in the Canadian Shield region.