Search for "New France"

Displaying 421-440 of 870 results
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Bas-Caraquet

Bas-Caraquet, NB, incorporated as a village in 1966, population 1380 (2011c), 1471 (2006c). The Village of Bas-Caraquet is located 7 km east of Caraquet.

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Allison Pass

Allison Pass, elevation 1,352 metres, is located at kilometre 60, the highest point on the Hope-Princeton Highway (opened 1949) through the Cascade Mountains of southern British Columbia.

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Roy Thomson Hall

Roy Thomson Hall. 2,630-seat Toronto concert hall, located in the block bounded by King, Simcoe and Wellington streets. It is managed by The Corporation of Massey Hall and Roy Thomson Hall and is home to the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir.

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Lethbridge

Lethbridge, AB, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 98,406 (2021 census), 92,729 (2016 census). The City of Lethbridge is located 215 km southeast of Calgary. It overlooks the steep valley of the Oldman River.

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History of Settlement in the Canadian Prairies

The Canadian Prairies were peopled in six great waves of migration, spanning from prehistory to the present. The migration from Asia, about 13,300 years ago, produced an Indigenous population of 20,000 to 50,000 by about 1640. Between 1640 and 1840, several thousand European and Canadian fur traders arrived, followed by several hundred British immigrants. They created dozens of small outposts and a settlement in the Red River Colony, where the Métis became the largest part of the population. The third wave, from the 1840s to the 1890s, consisted mainly but not solely of Canadians of British heritage. The fourth and by far the largest wave was drawn from many nations, mostly European. It occurred from 1897 to 1929, with a pause (1914–22) during and after the First World War. The fifth wave, drawn from other Canadian provinces and from Europe and elsewhere, commenced in the late 1940s. It lasted through the 1960s. The sixth wave, beginning in the 1970s, drew especially upon peoples of the southern hemisphere. It has continued, with fluctuations, to the present. Throughout the last century, the region has also steadily lost residents, as a result of migration to other parts of Canada, to the United States, and elsewhere.

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British Columbia

British Columbia is Canada's most westerly province, and is a mountainous area whose population is mainly clustered in its southwestern corner. BC is Canada’s third-largest province after Québec and Ontario, making up 10 per cent of Canada’s land surface. British Columbia is a land of diversity and contrast within small areas. Coastal landscapes, characterized by high, snow-covered mountains rising above narrow fjords and inlets, contrast with the broad forested upland of the central interior and the plains of the northeast. The intense "Britishness" of earlier times is referred to in the province's name, which originated with Queen Victoria and was officially proclaimed in 1858.

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Shaftesbury Hall

Shaftesbury Hall. The auditorium in Toronto's first YMCA, built at Queen and James streets in 1872 to designs by the architects Smith and Gemmel. The hall was on the ground floor with a direct entrance from the street, a double gallery, and a seating capacity of about 1700.

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Music in Calgary

Alberta city founded on or near the site of Fort la Jonquière which was built in 1751 at the junction of the Bow and Elbow rivers and was abandoned after 1785. Fort Brisebois, established there by the Northwest Mounted Police in 1875, was renamed Fort Calgary a year later.

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Yarmouth

Yarmouth, NS, incorporated as a town in 1890, population 6761 (2011c), 7162 (2006c). The Town of Yarmouth is located at the entrance to Yarmouth Harbour at the western tip of Nova Scotia and referred to as Eastern Canada's Gateway.

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Lake Timiskaming

Lake Timiskaming (Lac Témiscamingue), 304 km2, 108 km long, elev 180 m, is located on the Ontario and Québec border in the southwestern corner of Québec. Varying from a few hundred metres to 8 km in width, Lake Timiskaming straddles the boundary, half in Ontario and half in Québec.

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Klondike

Klondike (also spelled Klondyke). The name is derived from a Gwich'in word, thron-duick (hammer river), and identifies a town, a river, and a range of hills in the Yukon.

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Music at Sharon

Music at Sharon. Annual summer concert series at the Temple of the Children of Peace at Sharon, near Newmarket, Ontario, presented 1981-90 under the auspices of the York Pioneer and Historical Society.

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Music at McMaster University

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. Founded in 1887 as the result of the union of Toronto Baptist College and Woodstock College (a Baptist preparatory school), and named after Senator William McMaster. The first degrees were awarded in 1894.

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Fort William

Named in 1807 after NWC chief superintendent William MCGILLIVRAY, Fort William occupied a pivotal place in the company's vast trading network. In 1816-17 Lord SELKIRK occupied Fort William for 10 months as a consequence of the SEVEN OAKS INCIDENT.

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Moon

The dark grey lunar surface reflects only 7% of the sunlight it receives (comparable to the reflectivity of black soil). The moon is dominated by thousands of craters, ranging from microscopic pits to gigantic Clavius, diameter 230 km.