Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 181-200 of 769 results
Article

Cedar Dunes Provincial Park

Tucked into the westernmost corner of Prince Edward Island, Cedar Dunes Provincial Park (established 1962, 37 ha) has been developed around an historic lighthouse. Known as West Point, the site is the result of centuries of accretion of sand from a north to south coastal current.

Article

Stikine River

The Stikine River, 539 km long, rises in the Spatsizi Wilderness Park in northwestern British Columbia and flows in a wide arc north and west out of the Stikine Plateau uplands, then south through the spectacular Coast Mountains range to meet the Pacific Ocean near Wrangell, Alaska.

Article

Owen Sound

Owen Sound, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1920, population 21 688 (2011c), 21 753 (2006c). The City of Owen Sound is located on an inlet at the south end of GEORGIAN BAY, at the outlet of the Sydenham and Pottawatomi rivers, 190 km northwest of Toronto.

Article

Barrie

Barrie, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1959, population 147,829 (2021 census), 141,434 (2016 census). Barrie is located at the head of Kempenfelt Bay, on the western edge of Lake Simcoe. Located within Simcoe County, Barrie shares borders with the municipalities of Oro-Medonte, Springwater, Essa and Innisfil. Throughout history, the Barrie area has been home to different Indigenous groups, namely the Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabeg peoples. The land is covered by treaties 16 and 18.

Article

Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

Article

Music in Sherbrooke

City in southern Quebec, located about as far south of Quebec City as it is east of Montreal. With its suburbs it has a population reaching about 129,000 (1990); it has been called 'Queen of the Eastern Townships' or of 'L'Estrie,' the more recent name for the area.

Article

Stettler

Stettler, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1906, population 5748 (2011c), 5445 (2006c). The Town of Stettler, the county seat for County of Stettler, is located on the rolling prairie of south-central Alberta 203 km southeast of Edmonton on a creek flowing north to the Battle River.

Article

Hillsborough River

The Hillsborough River begins near the white sand beaches of the north shore and winds 45 km through rich farm country to its mouth (Charlottetown Harbour) on the south shore of Prince Edward Island. At its mouth, the North and West rivers come together to meet the Hillsborough.

Article

High Prairie

High Prairie, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1945 and as a town in 1950, population 2600 (2011c), 2785 (2006c). Located on the south edge of the Peace River region, the Town of High Prairie is 365 km northwest of Edmonton and 200 km northeast of Grande Prairie.

Article

Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

Article

Chambly

Chambly, Qué, City, pop 22 608 (2006c), 20 342 (2001c), inc 1965. Chambly is situated within the South Shore suburb area 25 km southeast of MONTRÉAL and is the centre of the rural Montérégie Region. The community fans out around Bassin de Chambly, a widening in the RIVIÈRE RICHELIEU.

Article

Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

Article

Ontario

Ontario is a Canadian province bounded by Manitoba to the west, Hudson Bay to the north, Québec to the east, and New York, the Great Lakes, Michigan and Minnesota to the south. The province was founded on parts of the traditional territories of the Ojibwa, Odawa, Potawatomi, Algonquin, Mississauga, Haudenosaunee, Neutral, Wendat, Cree, Oji-Cree and Métis. The land is now governed by 46 treaties, including the Upper Canada, Williams and Robinson treaties, as well as Treaties 3, 5 and 9. As of the 2016 census, Ontario had 13,448,494 residents, making it the most populous province or territory in Canada. Ontario was one of the founding members of Confederation, along with New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Québec, in 1867. The capital city of Ontario is Toronto. Doug Ford is the province’s current premier, leading a majority Progressive Conservative government.

Article

Battle of Vimy Ridge

The Battle of Vimy Ridge was fought during the First World War from 9 to 12 April 1917. It is Canada’s most celebrated military victory — an often mythologized symbol of the birth of Canadian national pride and awareness. The battle took place on the Western Front, in northern France. The four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting together for the first time, attacked the ridge from 9 to 12 April 1917 and captured it from the German army. It was the largest territorial advance of any Allied force to that point in the war — but it would mean little to the outcome of the conflict. More than 10,600 Canadians were killed and wounded in the assault. Today an iconic memorial atop the ridge honours the 11,285 Canadians killed in France throughout the war who have no known graves.

This is the full-length entry about the Battle of Vimy Ridge. For a plain-language summary, please see Battle of Vimy Ridge (Plain-Language Summary).

Article

Canada East

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) laid out the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union in 1840. The Province of Canada was made up of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada). The two regions were governed jointly until Confederation in 1867. Canada West then became Ontario and Canada East became Quebec.

Article

Cormorant Island

Cormorant Island is a small, wooded island fringed with rock beaches close to the northeast coast of Vancouver Island. ALERT BAY, a fishing port and commercial centre for nearby logging communities, is located on its south shore. The island boasts some of the finest TOTEM POLES on the BC coast.

Article

Kingsville

Kingsville, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1901, population 21 362 (2011c), 20 908 (2006c). The Town of Kingsville amalgamated with the townships of Gosfield South and Gosfield North in 1998. Kingsville is located about 40 km southeast of WINDSOR, in Essex County on the north shore of Lake Erie.

Article

Lac la Martre

Lac la Martre, 1777 km2, elev 265 m, max length 76 km, is located in the Northwest Territories, 50 km west of Behchokò and 150 km northwest of Yellowknife, and 346 km south of the Arctic Circle. The settlement of WHATÌ is located at the southeastern corner of the lake.

Article

Amadjuak Lake

Amadjuak Lake, 3115 km2, elevation 113 m, is one of 2 lakes situated in the Great Plain of the Koukdjuak in south-central Baffin Island. This lower-lying area only emerged recently (in geological terms) from beneath the waters of Foxe Basin. Amadjuak Lake is the third-largest in Nunavut.

Article

Rivière Moisie

Rivière Moisie, 410 km long, rises in eastern Québec from Lac Opocopa and flows south to the St. Lawrence River. With a drainage basin of 19,200 km2 and a mean discharge of 490 m3/s, it is the river of greatest volume along the middle north Shore of the St. Lawrence.