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Editorial

Habitants and French-Speaking Quebec

Habitants were once a symbol of French-speaking Quebec, in much the same way that cowboys became an iconic image of the American West and gauchos a symbol of Argentina. In the word’s most familiar meaning, going back to the late 17th century, a habitant was a farmer who worked and lived on a plot of land granted him by a wealthy seigneur (see Seigneurial System). Although the system of land tenure in Quebec changed in the wake of the British Conquest, for many decades afterwards the notion of a habitant remained crucial to the perceived identity of the province.

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La Malbaie

First named Baye des Morues, or "bay of cod," by Jean Alphonse in the 1500s, it was referred to as malle baye (latin, "bad bay") by Samuel de CHAMPLAIN in 1608 for its difficult anchorage. Some of New France's first rural settlements were located in the area.

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New Brunswick

New Brunswick is one of three provinces collectively known as the "Maritimes." Joined to Nova Scotia by the narrow Chignecto Isthmus and separated from Prince Edward Island by the Northumberland Strait, New Brunswick forms the land bridge linking this region to continental North America. It is bounded in the north by Québec and in the west by the US (Maine). In 1784, the British divided Nova Scotia at the Chignecto Isthmus, naming the west and north portion New Brunswick after the German duchy of Brunswick-Lunenburg. New Brunswick is now the only officially bilingual province in Canada.

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Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Canada’s oldest and one of its most important arts institutions, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal) has been guided by a commitment to attract people from all walks of life. Established in 1847, originally under the name of Montreal Society of Artists, it became the Art Association of Montreal in 1860. In 1948-49, the association formed a new corporation under its present name. In 1972, it became a semipublic institution, largely funded by grants from different government levels.

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Sydney

Sydney, NS, Urban Community. Sydney is located near the eastern extremity of CAPE BRETON ISLAND. It is the centre of the second-largest urban complex in Nova Scotia, CAPE BRETON REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY (1995).

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Rocky Mountains

Castlelike mountain resorts built on the rail line at Banff and Lake Louise have become all-season recreation centres for Banff National Park's (established 1885) many alpine attractions, which attract 4.5 million visitors annually.

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Ottawa

Ottawa, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 934,243 (2016 c), 883,391 (2011 c). The City of Ottawa is the capital of Canada and is located on the Ottawa River on Ontario's eastern boundary with Québec, about 200 km west of Montréal. The name "Ottawa" is thought to derive from an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the same name, probably from a word meaning "to trade" (see Odawa). Amalgamation, on 1 January 2001, merged "old" Ottawa with 11 area municipalities and the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton to create a “new” city. The amalgamated city encompasses the municipalities of Ottawa, Vanier, Nepean, Kanata, Gloucester and Cumberland; the townships of Rideau, West Carleton, Goulbourn and Osgoode; and the village of Rockcliffe Park.

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Fraser River Gold Rush

In 1858, around 30,000 gold seekers flooded the banks of the Fraser River from Hope to just north of Lillooet in British Columbia’s first significant gold rush. Although it dissipated by the mid-1860s, the Fraser River Gold Rush had a significant impact on the area’s Indigenous peoples and resulted in the Fraser Canyon War. Fears that the massive influx of American miners would lead the United States to annex the non-sovereign British territory known as New Caledonia also resulted in the founding of British Columbia as a colony on 2 August 1858 (see The Fraser River Gold Rush and the Founding of British Columbia). By the mid-1860s, the Fraser Rush collapsed, and British Columbia sank into a recession.

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Music at York University

York University. Non-denominational Toronto institution offering a range of part-time and full-time undergraduate and graduate degree programs and non-degree courses. It was founded in 1959 and accepted its first students in 1960. Its first campus - Glendon - opened in 1961.

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Paddle Prairie Metis Settlement

The Paddle Prairie Metis Settlement is one of eight Métis Settlements in Alberta. The community is located in the northwest corner of the province near the Peace River. It is 1,739 km2, or roughly two and a half times the size of Edmonton. This makes Paddle Prairie the largest of the eight settlements in terms of area. It also makes it larger than the largest First Nation reserve in both the province and the country. (Blood 148, held by Kainai Nation in southern Alberta, is 1,342.9 km2.) The population of Paddle Prairie is 536, according to the settlement’s 2019 census. In addition, people may be a member of the settlement but live elsewhere.

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Library of Parliament

The Library of Parliament came into being when the legislative libraries of Upper and Lower Canada were amalgamated in 1841 and situated in Montréal. In 1849 only 200 of the 12,000 books were saved when an angry mob protesting the Rebellion Losses Bill set fire to the Parliament Buildings.

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Sylvan Lake

Sylvan Lake, Alberta, incorporated as a village in 1913 and as a town in 1946, population 14,816 (2016 census), 12,362 (2011 census). The town of Sylvan Lake is located on the south shore of the lake of the same name in central Alberta, approximately 20 km west of Red Deer. The origin of the name is descriptive. The area was once heavily forested and the name is based on the Latin word sylva, which means wood or forest. The lake was known variously as Snake (by the Cree and Stoney-Nakoda), and Methy or Swan (by 19th century explorers). In 1909, a local resident, Mrs. Green, circulated a petition to change the lake’s name to Sylvan Lake.

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Saint-Lambert

Saint-Lambert, Quebec, population 21,861 (2016 census), 21,555 (2011 census). Saint-Lambert was settled beginning in the 17th century. It was first incorporated as a city in 1921 and reincorporated in 2006. Saint-Lambert was amalgamated into the city of Longueuil from 2002 until 2006 when it regained its municipal status. It is located along the South Shore of the St. Lawrence River across from Montreal, and is connected to that city by the Victoria bridge (completed 1859).

Saint-Lambert is situated on the ancestral lands of the Kanyen’kehà:ka. The land remains unceded and is considered Indigenous territory.

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Monument

A monument is normally a freestanding, large-scale structure, often artistically embellished, which has as its primary function the commemoration of persons, events or concepts believed to have sufficient importance to merit a public, visible and permanent tribute.