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Sicamous

Sicamous, British Columbia, incorporated as a district municipality in 1989, population 2,429 (2016 census), 2,441 (2011 census). The District of Sicamous is located at the eastern end of Shuswap Lake in south-central British Columbia, 140 km east of Kamloops. It lies to the west of the Monashee Mountains on a narrow strip of land between Shuswap and Mara lakes. Its name derives from a Secwepemc First Nation word meaning “narrow” or “squeezed in the middle.” (See also Interior Salish.)

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Canada and the Battle of Passchendaele

The Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was fought during the First World War from 31 July to 10 November 1917. The battle took place on the Ypres salient on the Western Front, in Belgium, where German and Allied armies had been deadlocked for three years. On 31 July, the British began a new offensive, attempting to break through German lines by capturing a ridge near the ruined village of Passchendaele. After British, Australian and New Zealand troops launched failed assaults, the Canadian Corps joined the battle on 26 October. The Canadians captured the ridge on 6 November, despite heavy rain and shelling that turned the battlefield into a quagmire. Nearly 16,000 Canadians were killed or wounded. The Battle of Passchendaele did nothing to help the Allied effort and became a symbol of the senseless slaughter of the First World War.

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Maxville

Maxville, ON, former municipality, population 816 (2016 census), 811 (2011 census). Maxville is located southeast of Ottawa. It began around 1869 and expanded rapidly when the Canada Atlantic Railway established a station there in 1881. Maxville was incorporated as a village in 1891, but is now part of the township of North Glengarry (1998).

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Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivières, Qué, City, pop 46 264 (2001c), 48 419 (1996c), 49 426 (1991c), 77.83 km2, inc 1857, the regional capital of Québec's Mauricie region, is located on the west shore of the mouth of Rivière Saint-Maurice​, midway between Québec City and Montréal. Its name derives from the 3-armed delta formed by the river's islands at its mouth.

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Geography of Ontario

Ontario is divided by three of Canada’s seven physiographic regions. These three regions are the Hudson Bay Lowlands, the Canadian Shield and the St. Lawrence Lowlands. Agriculture, as well as most of the population, is concentrated in the south. Despite the tendency to divide the province into three regions, there are distinct areas within these broad classifications. Geology, climate, soil and vegetation combine to create these distinct areas.

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Bras d'Or Lake

Bras d'Or Lake, 1099 km2, is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean occupying the centre of Cape Breton Island that nearly divides the island in two. On the north it is linked to the ocean by a narrow channel down the west side of Boularderie Island.

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Olds

Olds, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1905, population 8235 (2011c), 7253 (2006c). The Town of Olds is situated in a transition zone between prairie grassland and partially wooded parkland 89 km north of Calgary.

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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Chibougamau

EconomyChibougamau has gold and silver as well as copper. Forestry (cutting and sawmill operations) and commercial activities are also important. The town takes advantage of its northern location each year by organizing a "Folies frettes" festival and an international snowmobiling rally.

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Fraser River

The Fraser River is the longest river in British Columbia, stretching 1,375 km. It begins on the western side of the Rocky Mountains at Mount Robson Provincial Park, and ends in the Strait of Georgia at Vancouver. Named for explorer Simon Fraser, the river was a transportation route and source of food for the Indigenous people of the region long before Fraser travelled its waters. In 1858, gold was discovered on sandbars south of Yale, setting off the Fraser River Gold rush.

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Îles de la Madeleine

Preceded by Basque fishermen, Jacques Cartier arrived at Île Brion in 1534; he named it in honour of the great French admiral. He christened the islands "Les Araynes" (arènes is a French poetry word for sand) because of the endless beaches of sand. Later French fishermen called them Îles Ramées.

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Orkney

Since 1926 the Rural Municipality of Orkney has had a joint administration with the neighbouring rural municipality of Wallace. There are 2 communities in the rural municipality, Orcadia, a stop on the Canadian Pacific Railway line and White Spruce.

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Tagish (Yukon)

The name Tagish apparently comes from "Ta-Gish-Ai", a word for "fish trap" and the name of the local First Nations band.

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Bathurst Island

Bathurst Island, 16 042 km2 and over 18 000 km2 including its offshore islands, is located in the Arctic Archipelago. The present position of the North magnetic pole is near its northern end.

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Matane

In the 1950s, the closing of several paper mills resulted in widespread unemployment. A decade later, however, the recognition of Matane's port as an important regional transportation and distribution point revived interest in the town. There is now a pulp mill and a paper mill providing employment.

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Montmagny

Jacques CARTIER passed Montmagny and its many offshore islands in 1535 and noted its beautiful surroundings. In 1646 a seigneury containing the area was granted to Huault, although permanent European habitation did not begin until the 1670s.