Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 381-400 of 739 results
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Sainte-Thérèse

In 1714, Gaspard Piot de Langloiserie and his spouse, Marie-Thérèse du Gué, received the seigneury of Mille-Iles. In 1735 colonization occurred mainly through the efforts of the widow Marie-Thérèse du Gué and continued through her descendants.

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Bécancour

The city is named for René Robineau de Bécancour, who led an expedition against the Iroquois in 1696. The first French missionary contact with the local Abenaki occurred in 1669, and a permanent European settlement was established 3 years later.

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Oak Island

In 1795, 16-year-old Daniel McGinnis discovered a depression in the ground near a huge oak tree and evidence that a block and tackle had been used there. McGinnis and 2 friends dug at the site, revealing a filled-in shaft with platforms of decayed oak logs at 3 m levels.

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Baffin Island

Baffin Island, Nunavut, 507,451 km2, 1,500 km long and 200–700 km wide, is the largest island in Canada and the fifth-largest island in the world.

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Columbia River

The Columbia River runs from the southeast corner of British Columbia through Washington and Oregon states to the Pacific Ocean.

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Forest Regions

A forest region is a major geographic belt or zone characterized by a broad uniformity both in physiography and in the composition of the dominant tree species. Canada can be divided into eight forest regions.

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Alberta

Alberta, the westernmost of Canada's three Prairie provinces, shares many physical features with its neighbours to the east, Saskatchewan and  Manitoba. The Rocky Mountains form the southern portion of Alberta's western boundary with British Columbia. Alberta was named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. The province is home to the country’s largest deposits of oil and natural gas.

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St Lawrence Hall

In 1967, as a Toronto centennial project, the building was restored, and the auditorium came into use again for social functions and chamber music concerts.The building also houses the administrative offices and rehearsal rooms of the National Ballet of Canada.

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Chetwynd

Chetwynd, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1983, population 2635 (2011c), 2633 (2006c). The District of Chetwynd is located in the valley of the Pine River near Pine Pass to the west, in the northeast corner of British Columbia, 310 km north of PRINCE GEORGE.

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Hinton

Hinton, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1958, population 9640 (2011c), 9738 (2006c).

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Deux-Montagnes

The area was first developed for summer cottages. Later, its proximity to Montréal turned this locality into a residential suburb. Tourism and agriculture, once the mainstays of the local economy, have almost disappeared.

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Altona

The town site was established in 1895 on a Canadian Pacific Railway spur near the agricultural village of Altona, settled in 1880 as part of a reserve W of the Red River for Mennonites from Russia.

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Milk River

WRITING-ON-STONE PROVINCIAL PARK and a natural area in Alberta protect parts of the river's remarkable landscapes. The American explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark gave the Milk River its name (in 1805) because its colour reminded them of a cup of tea mixed with milk.

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Lynn Lake

Lynn Lake, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1997, population 482 (2011c), 714 (2006c). The Town of Lynn Lake is a community located 1066 km by road northwest of Winnipeg on the Canadian SHIELD.

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Tadoussac

Tadoussac, Quebec, incorporated as a village in 1899, population 799 (2016 census), 813 (2011 census). Tadoussac is located at the confluence of the Saguenay and St. Lawrence rivers, 210 km northeast of Quebec City. In the Innu language, Totouskak means "breasts," a reference to the rounded hills found near the village.

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Mount Logan

Logan, Mount, elev 5959 m, is Canada's highest mountain, named after Sir William E. Logan by Prof I.C. Russell, who first saw it during an attempted ascent of Mt St Elias in 1890.

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Humboldt

Its designation as a railway divisional point fostered growth, as did the establishment of St Peters Colony (50 townships) by the Roman Catholic Order of St Benedict (1903).

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Greater Napanee

Greater Napanee, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1864, population 15 511 (2011c), 15 400 (2006c). The Town of Greater Napanee is located 39 km west of Kingston on the Napanee River and six km from the Bay of Quinte on Lake Ontario.

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.