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Hamilton

Hamilton, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1846, population 536,917 (2016 c), 519,949 (2011 c). The City of Hamilton is situated at the west end of Lake Ontario, on Burlington Bay, 68 km southwest of Toronto, and 66 km west of Niagara Falls and the American border. As part of the reorganization of municipal governments in Ontario, the boundaries of the city were enlarged in 2001 to include much of the surrounding suburban and rural area, including the former towns of Ancaster, Dundas, Flamborough and Stoney Creek, and the former township of Glanbrook. The city is Canada's largest steel producer and a major Great Lakes port.

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Toronto Feature: Budapest Park

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

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Columbia Icefield

The Columbia Icefield is a mass of ice covering a high plateau between Mount Columbia (3747 m), the highest point in Alberta, and Mount Athabasca (3491 m), located between Banff and Jasper national parks, along the BC-Alberta border.

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Cumberland House

The construction of Cumberland House in 1774 marked a change in HBC policy, which had hitherto expected Indigenous people to bring their furs to the bay posts to trade.

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Historic Dunvegan

One of the most important fur trade sites on the PEACE RIVER, a post operated at Dunvegan from 1805 to 1918. The first post was built by Archibald Norman McLeod of the North West Company to trade with the BEAVER and other First Nations who lived in the middle and upper reaches of the Peace River.

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Monument-National

Its 1620-seat theatre, which boasted an orchestra pit, was inaugurated in 1893 while still uncompleted. In the ensuing years it welcomed innumerable solo artists, opera companies, and other musical troupes and ensembles.

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Sirmilik National Park

Located on northern Baffin Island in Canada's High Arctic, Sirmilik National Park (agreement signed 1999; 22 250 km2) is one of Canada's isolated and most spectacular national parks. Sirmilik is an Inuktitut word that means "place of glaciers."

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Lake Superior

Lake Superior is one of the largest bodies of fresh water in the world, containing more water than all the other Great Lakes combined. With an area of 82,100 km2 (of which 28,750 km2 lies in Canada), when including the American portion, Lake Superior is Canada’s largest lake. It has a shoreline of 2,938 km, with the north shore bordering on Ontario and the south shore on the states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The lake is 563 km long, 257 km wide, with a mean depth of 147 m and a maximum depth of 406 m. It has an elevation of 183 m.

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Qausuittuq National Park

Qausuittuq National Park encompasses 11,000 km2 on northern Bathurst Island and smaller surrounding islands in Nunavut. It also includes the waters of May Inlet and Young Inlet. Pronounced Kow-soo-ee-took, the name of this park translates to “the place where the sun doesn’t rise” in Inuktitut. It is bordered to the south by Polar Bear Pass National Wildlife Area, and together these two zones protect a large, ecologically intact area in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Qausuittuq was established on 1 September 2015 as Canada’s 45th national park. It represents the Western High Arctic Natural Region, the 38th natural region of the 39 that constitute Canada’s national parks system.

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Physiographic Regions

Canada may be divided into seven physiographic regions: Arctic Lands, Cordillera, Interior Plains, Hudson Bay Lowland, Canadian Shield Forest Lands, St Lawrence Lowlands and Appalachia.

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Elgin Settlement

The Elgin Settlement, also known as Buxton, was one of four organized Black settlements developed in Southwestern Ontario in the mid-1800s. Established in 1849 by Reverend William King, the Elgin Settlement was one of the last stops on the Underground Railroad. Today, the settlement is a national historic site within the Municipality of Chatham-Kent. It was named in honour of Lord Elgin, governor general of Upper Canada. The name “Buxton” paid tribute to Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, a slave trade abolitionist. While the community was officially known as the Elgin Settlement, at its heart was the Buxton Mission. The Elgin Settlement was the largest of the four Black settlements and considered the most successful.

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Anjou

First part of the parish municipality of Saint-Léonard-de-Port-Maurice from 1886 to 1916, it was set up as a separate municipality in 1916 and incorporated as a city 50 years later.

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Saint John River

Saint John River, 673 km long, rises in northern Maine and flows northeast into the forests of Madawaska County to Edmundston, where it is joined by the Madawaska River and turns southeast, forming much of the border between Maine and New Brunswick.

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Canadian War Museum

The museum's four permanent exhibition spaces, called the Canadian Experience Galleries, are arranged in chronological fashion to trace the history of armed conflict and its effect on Canadian history and culture.

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The Rocks Provincial Park

Mammoth pillars, the Rocks, rise out of the sea at Hopewell Cape on New Brunswick's southern coast. The Rocks Provincial Park (established 1958, 120 ha) is located halfway between Moncton and Fundy National Park.

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Ashcroft

Ashcroft, BC, incorporated as a village in 1952, population 1628 (2011c), 1664 (2006c). The Village of Ashcroft is situated on a flat bench above the Thompson River in the dry belt of the interior of southern British Columbia, about 90 km west of Kamloops.