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Cassiar District

The Cassiar District lies in British Columbia's northwest corner; it historically encompasses the Stikine and Dease River watersheds and that of the upper Taku, NASS and Kechika.

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Old Crow

Muskrat trapping provided a major source of income for the Vuntut Gwitchin from the early 1900s. They were a nomadic people, living seasonally, strictly off the land and animals.

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Grise Fiord

Grise Fiord, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1987, population 130 (2011c), 141 (2006c). The Hamlet of Grise Fiord is located on the south coast of ELLESMERE ISLAND.

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Cumberland House

The construction of Cumberland House in 1774 marked a change in HBC policy, which had hitherto expected Indigenous people to bring their furs to the bay posts to trade.

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Whatì

Whatì, NWT, established as community government in 2005, population 492 (2011c), 460 (2006c). The community of Whatì (earlier spelling Wha Ti) is located on Lac La Martre, 164 km northwest of Yellowknife.

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Nahanni Butte

Nahanni Butte, NWT, Settlement, population 102 (2011c), 115 (2006c). The settlement of Nahanni Butte is located on the north side of the SOUTH NAHANNI RIVER near its junction with the LIARD RIVER, about 125 km north of the Northwest Territories and British Columbia border.

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Nanisivik

Nanisivik, Nunavut, is a settlement located on the south shore of Strathcona Sound on the Borden Peninsula of Baffin Island, 280 km northwest of Iqaluit.

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Sillery (Qué)

Sillery has a grand history dating back to the 17th century. It was the site of Canada's first Indian reserve and Jesuit mission, Sillery, on the edge of the St Lawrence. The reserve was funded by Noël Brulart de Sillery (1577-1640), for whom the town was named.

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Haines Junction

This part of the Yukon is home to the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and the site of the village -- called Dakwakada or "high cache" -- was used as a stopping place along a trade route. Today Haines Junction is their administrative centre.

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Sillery

Sillery was the first reserve created by Europeans for Aboriginal peoples in what is now Canada. It was established in 1637 near Québec City. It was funded by a French nobleman, Noël Brûlart de Sillery, in response to an advertisement placed by Father Paul Le Jeune in the Jesuit Relations.

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Keno Hill

Keno Hill (or Keno City), YT, Settlement, pop 15 (2006c), 20 (2001c). Keno Hill is located 122 km northwest of the Klondike Highway, 466 km by road north from Whitehorse. In 1919 Louis Beauvette staked the Roulette silver-lead claim on top of Keno Hill in the MAYO district.

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Uummannarjuaq (Blacklead Island)

 Uummannarjuaq, which means "like a big sea mammal's heart," had long been an Inuit seasonal campsite. The island attracted whalers because of its strategic location close to the floe edge--the boundary between shore ice and open water where the spring whale hunt took place.

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Reserves

In 2016, 744,855 people identified as First Nations with Indian Status, 44.2 per cent of which lived on reserves. Reserves are governed by the Indian Act, and residence on a reserve is governed by band councils as well as the federal government. Under the Indian Act, reserves that serve as residences are referred to as Indian Bands. Many reserves or bands are now referred to as First Nations. Reserves may serve as spiritual and physical homelands for their people, but they are also tangible representations of colonial governance. As such they are often the focal point of activism relating to land claims, resource management, cultural appropriation, socio-economic conditions, self-governance and cultural self-determination.

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Gwaii Haanas

At 1,470 km2, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site (also known as Gwaii Haanas) encompasses 15 per cent of Haida Gwaii.

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Carcross

Carcross, Yukon, settlement, population 301 (2016 census), 289 (2011 census). Carcross is a major Tagish and Tlingit community located at the north end of Bennett Lake, 74 km south of Whitehorse.

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Reserves in Nova Scotia

There are 13 First Nation communities in Nova Scotia. Spread over 42 reserves and settlements, these communities range from Acadia First Nation in the southwest to Membertou First Nation in northeastern Cape Breton. Of Nova Scotia’s 19,090 registered Mi’kmaq (in 2018), 10,878 live on reserve. Eight of these communities are on mainland Nova Scotia, and five are in Cape Breton. Their reserves vary in size from over 3,500 hectares to less than one, though almost every community has more than one land tract. Nova Scotia is unusual for the makeup of its on-reserve First Nation communities, in that they are all Mi’kmaq. In terms of the number of First Nation communities, Nova Scotia is comparable to New Brunswick (with 15 First Nations) and Yukon (18 First Nations). Other provinces, such as Ontario and British Columbia, have many more First Nation communities (127 and nearly 200, respectively), while those like Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador have significantly fewer (two and four, respectively).

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Gjoa Haven

Gjoa Haven, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1981, population 1,324 (2016 census), 1,279 (2011 census). The hamlet of Gjoa Haven is located on the southeast coast of King William Island, off the mainland Arctic coast, and just over 1,320 km northwest of Iqaluit. Channels and bays in the area are icebound for most of the year. It derived its name from Roald Amundsen, the first person to navigate the Northwest Passage. He wintered there and called the site after his ship, the Gjoa.