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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Wetaskiwin

Wetaskiwin, Alta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 12 525 (2011c), 11 689 (2006c). The City of Wetaskiwin is one of Alberta’s oldest cities. It began (1891) as Siding 16 on the Calgary-Edmonton Railway and was a point of departure for early, predominantly Scandinavian homesteaders.

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Winnipeg

Winnipeg, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1873, population 705,244 (2016 c), 663,617 (2011 c). The city of Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of Manitoba, and is located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River 100 km north of the Minnesota border. The name is derived from the Cree name for Lake Winnipeg, 65 km north, win-nipi, meaning "murky water." Winnipeg is an important economic and cultural centre for the Prairies. Lying midway between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, it has been called "Bull's Eye of the Dominion," and because of its location between the Canadian Shield and the prairie, "Gateway to the West."

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Swift Current

Swift Current began to adopt the persona of a community in 1883 with the appearance of a dam, water tank, freight sheds, roadhouse and dining room. For many years it has served a large ranching, mixed-farming and grain-farming area.

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Whitehorse

 Whitehorse, Yukon, incorporated as a city in 1950, population 25,085 (2016 c), 23,276 (2011 c). The City of Whitehorse, the capital of Yukon, is located about 87 km north of the British Columbia border. Communities like Whitehorse, which fall along the Alaska Highway, are often identified by where they sit on this stretch of road. With Dawson Creek, British Columbia at 0 km, Whitehorse is at kilometre 1,476. The city lies mainly on the western side of the Yukon River on a 600 m wide river plain backed by a steep escarpment with a plateau-like summit 60 m above. The Whitehorse landscape is dominated by Canyon Mountain (locally known as Grey Mountain) to the east, Haeckel Hill to the northwest and Golden Horn Mountain to the south. Nestled in a protected valley, Whitehorse enjoys a moderate climate for the North, with warm, dry summers. Long hours of summer daylight (almost 20 hours in June) offset a short growing season and dark winters.

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Brantford

Brantford, ON, incorporated as a city in 1877, population 97,496 (2016 census), 93,650 (2011 census). The City of Brantford is located on the Grand River, 104 km southwest of Toronto. It is home to several manufacturing industries, educational institutions and heritage sites.

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Laterrière

The name was first applied to the township (1850) and then the parish (1882). They were named after Marc-Pascal de Sales Laterrière, who represented Saguenay in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.

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LaSalle

History In 1667, René-Robert Cavelier de la Salle became seigneur of the land of present-day LaSalle. In order to avoid the Lachine Rapids, traders, explorers and Indigenous people portaged along a path that would become LaSalle Boulevard.

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Rosemère

In 1880, Rosemère was primarily an agricultural community. The beauty of the Laurentides region was later discovered and Rosemère established itself as a holiday destination.

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Westmount

Westmount's location on the slopes of Mont Royal attracted well-to-do residents, and it quickly became one of Canada's most fashionable communities. Long considered an English-speaking enclave in Montréal, it is now a bilingual community with a varied population.

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Brockville

Brockville, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1962, population 21 870 (2011c), 21 957 (2006c). The City of Brockville is located on the St Lawrence River, 80 km east of Kingston.

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Sainte-Thérèse

In 1714, Gaspard Piot de Langloiserie and his spouse, Marie-Thérèse du Gué, received the seigneury of Mille-Iles. In 1735 colonization occurred mainly through the efforts of the widow Marie-Thérèse du Gué and continued through her descendants.

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Edmundston

Edmundston, NB, incorporated as a city in 1952, population 16 032 (2011c), 16 643 (2006c). The City of Edmundston is nestled on the eastern bank of the SAINT JOHN RIVER, opposite Madawaska, Maine, and 285 km north of FREDERICTON.

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Pointe-Claire

Pointe-Claire was first set up as a village municipality under the name of Saint-Joachim-de-la-Pointe-Claire in 1854. Its name was shortened when it was incorporated.

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Saint-Félicien

The town profited from the Chibougamau-Chapais mining boom of the 1950s, since nearly all the copper extracted from Chibougamau and Chapais (280 km northwest of Lac Saint-Jean) left the region via Saint-Félicien.

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Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville

The seigneury of Montarville was originally granted to Pierre Boucher de Boucherville Junior in 1710. The Boucherville family combined the last 6 letters of their name to the first 2 syllables of the French word for mountain (montagne).

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Côte-Saint-Luc

Côte-Saint-Luc, originally settled in the 18th century, remained a farming community until the middle of the 20th century. In 1818, the total population of the community was 209; in 1940 it had only reached 747.

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L'Ancienne-Lorette

The history of L'Ancienne-Lorette goes back to 1674, when the Jesuit Pierre Chaumonot (1611-93) built a chapel on this site for the HURONS who had been forced to flee their homeland (Ontario) by the Iroquois.

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Vanier (Qué)

Vanier, Qué, City, pop 11 054 (2001c), 11 174 (1996c), 10 833(1991c), area 4.59 km2, inc 1916, was originally named Québec-Ouest until 1966, when it was changed to Vanier in honour of Governor-General Georges-Philéas VANIER.