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Displaying 141-160 of 218 results
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Port au Choix

Port au Choix, NL, incorporated as a town in 1966, population 839 (2011c), 893 (2006c). The Town of Port au Choix is located on the west side of the Northern Peninsula.

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St. John's

St. John's, NL, incorporated as a city in 1921, population 108,860 (2016 c), 106,172 (2011 c). The capital and largest city of Newfoundland and Labrador, the city of St. John's is located on the eastern side of the Avalon Peninsula of southeast Newfoundland. Its landlocked harbour is approached through a long, narrow channel and is protected by the high hills on which the city is built. The origin of the name St. John's is not known, but its use appears on a Portuguese map by Pedro Reinel (1516–20) as "Rio de San Johem" and later, in a 1527 letter by the English seaman John Rut, as the "Haven of St. John's." According to popular folklore, however, the city takes its name from the feast of Saint John the Baptist and the arrival of Italian explorer Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot) on the shores of Newfoundland on 24 June 1497.

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Varennes

Canada's largest concentration of researchers in the field of ENERGY is concentrated in Varennes.

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Saint-Jérôme

A regional metropolis situated where Rivière du Nord leaves the Laurentians, Saint-Jérôme dominates the entire Lower Laurentians. The bishopric, courthouse and CEGEP give the town an administrative function as well as industrial and commercial ones.

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Sept-Îles

The first permanent European settlement dates from 1651: the Ange-Gardien mission founded by Father Jean de Quen. A trading and fishing post set up there in 1676 by Louis Jolliet was ceded in the 19th century to the Hudson's Bay Company.

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Greenfield Park

The site of Greenfield Park was part of the Seigneury of Longueuil. The area remained primarily agricultural until the mid-19th century, when railway development began to encourage the growth of the towns and villages around the city of MONTRÉAL.

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Owen Sound

Owen Sound, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1920, population 21 688 (2011c), 21 753 (2006c). The City of Owen Sound is located on an inlet at the south end of GEORGIAN BAY, at the outlet of the Sydenham and Pottawatomi rivers, 190 km northwest of Toronto.

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Lethbridge

Lethbridge, AB, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 92,729 (2016 census), 83,517 (2011 census). The City of Lethbridge is located 215 km southeast of Calgary. It overlooks the steep valley of the Oldman River.

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Castlegar

Castlegar, BC, incorporated as a city in 1974, population 7816 (2011c), 7259 (2006c). The City of Castlegar is located on the west bank of the COLUMBIA RIVER at its junction with the Kootenay River, midway between Calgary and Vancouver, and about 35 km north of the US border.

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Armstrong

Armstrong, BC, incorporated as a city in 1913, population 4815 (2011c), 4241 (2006c). The City of Armstrong is the business centre of a farm and forest economy of the Spallumcheen district. It is at the north end of the Okanagan Valley 23 km N of Vernon and 13 km S of Enderby.

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Bécancour

The city is named for René Robineau de Bécancour, who led an expedition against the Iroquois in 1696. The first French missionary contact with the local Abenaki occurred in 1669, and a permanent European settlement was established 3 years later.

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Chambly

Chambly, Qué, City, pop 22 608 (2006c), 20 342 (2001c), inc 1965. Chambly is situated within the South Shore suburb area 25 km southeast of MONTRÉAL and is the centre of the rural Montérégie Region. The community fans out around Bassin de Chambly, a widening in the RIVIÈRE RICHELIEU.

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Medicine Hat

Medicine Hat, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 63,260 (2016 census), 60,005 (2011 census). The city of Medicine Hat is one of Alberta's largest cities. It is located on the Canadian Pacific Railway main line and the Trans-Canada Highway in the southeastern corner of the province, bisected by the South Saskatchewan River. Canada's “sunniest” city, Medicine Hat averages 330 days of sunshine per year. A council of eight councillors and a mayor govern the city.

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Abbotsford

Abbotsford, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1995, population 141,397 (2016 census), 133,497 (2011 census). The amalgamation of the district municipalities of Matsqui and Abbotsford formed the city of Abbotsford. Abbotsford is located on the south bank of the Fraser River, 76 km east of Vancouver. The city is named after Harry Braithwaite Abbott, the general superintendent for the British Columbia division of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Abbotsford is BC's fifth most populous municipality.

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Halifax

Halifax, Nova Scotia, incorporated as a city in 1841, population 403,131 (2016 c), 390,096 (2011 c). Halifax is the capital of Nova Scotia and the largest urban area in Atlantic Canada. On 1 April 1996 Halifax was amalgamated with neighbouring communities to form the Halifax Regional Municipal Government. Halifax Regional Municipality occupies a strategic and central location on the province's east coast and is one of the world's largest harbours. Sometimes called "Warden of the North" for its historic military role, today it is a major regional centre for Atlantic Canada's economy.

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Prince George

Prince George, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1915, population 74,003 (2016 census), 71,974 (2011 census). Prince George is the largest city in the northern part of the province. It is situated in the geographical centre of British Columbia at the junction of the Nechako and Fraser rivers. Prince George was founded on the traditional territory of the Lheidli T'enneh, a sub-group of the Dakelh or Carrier Dene. The Dakelh aided Alexander Mackenzie on his journey to the Pacific coast in 1793.

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Sarnia

Sarnia, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1914, population 71,594 (2016 c), 72,366 (2011 c). The City of Sarnia is located at the convergence of the St. Clair River and Lake Huron, 100 km west of London. A railway tunnel beneath the St. Clair and a highway bridge from nearby Point Edward connect Sarnia with Port Huron, Michigan. Sarnia is a major centre for the petrochemical industry and the southern terminus of an oil pipeline from Alberta. It was also the home of Alexander Mackenzie, first Liberal prime minister of Canada.

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Québec City

Québec City, Québec, founded in 1608, population 531,902 (2016 c), 516,576 (2011 c). Québec City, the capital of the province of Québec, is located on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River where it meets the Rivière Saint-Charles. Here, the St. Lawrence narrows to a width of just over 1 km, and navigation is made difficult by a group of islands, the largest of which is Île d'Orléans. Cap-Diamant, a promontory with an elevation of 98 m, dominates the site and was used effectively as a fortification, earning Québec City the name "Gibraltar of North America." The name "Québec" is probably derived from an Algonquian word meaning "narrowing of the river."

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Surrey

Surrey, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1993, population 517,887 (2016 census), 468, 251 (2011 census). The city of Surrey is the second-largest municipality by population in British Columbia, after Vancouver. Part of Metro Vancouver, it is bounded by the Fraser River on the north and Washington state on the south. The municipalities of Langley and Delta lie to the east and west.

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Calgary

Calgary, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 1894, population 1,239,220 (2016 census) 1,096,833 (2011 census). The city of Calgary is situated on the Bow River in southern Alberta, about 220 km north of the American border at the meeting point of the Western prairies and mountain foothills. It is the financial centre of western Canada, based on its key role in the development of the region’s oil and gas industry. With its panoramic backdrop of the Rocky Mountains and its historic association with cattle ranching and oil exploration, Calgary is one of Canada’s most identifiable cities.