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Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivières, Qué, City, pop 46 264 (2001c), 48 419 (1996c), 49 426 (1991c), 77.83 km2, inc 1857, the regional capital of Québec's Mauricie region, is located on the west shore of the mouth of Rivière Saint-Maurice​, midway between Québec City and Montréal. Its name derives from the 3-armed delta formed by the river's islands at its mouth.

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Fort St John

Fort St John, BC, incorporated as a city in 1975, population 18 609 (2011c), 17 402 (2006c). The City of Fort St John is located in northeastern British Columbia, about 459 km north of PRINCE GEORGE.

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Sudbury

Greater Sudbury, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 2001, population 164,689 (2016 census), 163,067 (2011 census). The judicial seat for the District of Sudbury, the City of Greater Sudbury is located on the western shore of Ramsey Lake, about 60 km north of Georgian Bay. When incorporated in 2001, it replaced the former Regional Municipality of Sudbury (1973–2000) and City of Sudbury (1930–2000). The city owes much of its development to the mining industry, in particular the mining of nickel. The largest urban area in northeastern Ontario, Greater Sudbury now offers a concentration of business, cultural and educational services and is recognized for the impressive regreening program that it has been carrying out since the 1970s.

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Mascouche

The history of Mascouche was closely linked to the roles played by Gabriel Christie and Peter and his son John Pangman, 3 of the last owners of the Seigneury de La Chesnaye.

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Montréal-Est

Montréal-Est owes its existence to Joseph Versailles, an important Montréal broker. In 1909 he bought 6 km2 of land in order to create a quiet and peaceful residential community. Heavy industry developed around the port and the community evolved away from Versailles's original vision.

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Rossland

Rossland, BC, incorporated as a city in 1897, population 3556 (2011c), 3278 (2006c). The City of Rossland is located 10 km southwest of TRAIL in the eroded crater of a long-extinct volcano of the MONASHEE MOUNTAINS.

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Yellowknife

Yellowknife, NWT, incorporated as a city in 1970, population 19,569 (2016 c), 19,234 (2011 c). The City of Yellowknife is the capital of the Northwest Territories and the territory's only city. It sits on the Canadian Shield, on the north shore of Great Slave Lake, 512 km from the Arctic Circle and approximately 1,513 km north of Edmonton, Alberta. Due to its northerly location, Yellowknife is the Canadian city with the most hours of summer sunshine, averaging 1,030 hours per year. The city and Yellowknife Bay were named after the Yellowknives, a Dene band who lived on the islands of Great Slave's East Arm and travelled as far north as the Arctic coast to obtain copper for knives and other implements. They, in turn, acquired their name from the copper-bladed knives they carried.

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Wetaskiwin

Wetaskiwin, Alta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 12 525 (2011c), 11 689 (2006c). The City of Wetaskiwin is one of Alberta’s oldest cities. It began (1891) as Siding 16 on the Calgary-Edmonton Railway and was a point of departure for early, predominantly Scandinavian homesteaders.

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Winnipeg

Winnipeg, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1873, population 705,244 (2016 c), 663,617 (2011 c). The city of Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of Manitoba, and is located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River 100 km north of the Minnesota border. The name is derived from the Cree name for Lake Winnipeg, 65 km north, win-nipi, meaning "murky water." Winnipeg is an important economic and cultural centre for the Prairies. Lying midway between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, it has been called "Bull's Eye of the Dominion," and because of its location between the Canadian Shield and the prairie, "Gateway to the West."

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Swift Current

Swift Current began to adopt the persona of a community in 1883 with the appearance of a dam, water tank, freight sheds, roadhouse and dining room. For many years it has served a large ranching, mixed-farming and grain-farming area.

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Whitehorse

 Whitehorse, Yukon, incorporated as a city in 1950, population 25,085 (2016 c), 23,276 (2011 c). The City of Whitehorse, the capital of Yukon, is located about 87 km north of the British Columbia border. Communities like Whitehorse, which fall along the Alaska Highway, are often identified by where they sit on this stretch of road. With Dawson Creek, British Columbia at 0 km, Whitehorse is at kilometre 1,476. The city lies mainly on the western side of the Yukon River on a 600 m wide river plain backed by a steep escarpment with a plateau-like summit 60 m above. The Whitehorse landscape is dominated by Canyon Mountain (locally known as Grey Mountain) to the east, Haeckel Hill to the northwest and Golden Horn Mountain to the south. Nestled in a protected valley, Whitehorse enjoys a moderate climate for the North, with warm, dry summers. Long hours of summer daylight (almost 20 hours in June) offset a short growing season and dark winters.

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Brantford

Brantford, ON, incorporated as a city in 1877, population 97,496 (2016 census), 93,650 (2011 census). The City of Brantford is located on the Grand River, 104 km southwest of Toronto. It is home to several manufacturing industries, educational institutions and heritage sites.

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Laterrière

The name was first applied to the township (1850) and then the parish (1882). They were named after Marc-Pascal de Sales Laterrière, who represented Saguenay in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.

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LaSalle

History In 1667, René-Robert Cavelier de la Salle became seigneur of the land of present-day LaSalle. In order to avoid the Lachine Rapids, traders, explorers and Indigenous people portaged along a path that would become LaSalle Boulevard.

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Rosemère

In 1880, Rosemère was primarily an agricultural community. The beauty of the Laurentides region was later discovered and Rosemère established itself as a holiday destination.

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Westmount

Westmount's location on the slopes of Mont Royal attracted well-to-do residents, and it quickly became one of Canada's most fashionable communities. Long considered an English-speaking enclave in Montréal, it is now a bilingual community with a varied population.

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Brockville

Brockville, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1962, population 21 870 (2011c), 21 957 (2006c). The City of Brockville is located on the St Lawrence River, 80 km east of Kingston.

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Sainte-Thérèse

In 1714, Gaspard Piot de Langloiserie and his spouse, Marie-Thérèse du Gué, received the seigneury of Mille-Iles. In 1735 colonization occurred mainly through the efforts of the widow Marie-Thérèse du Gué and continued through her descendants.