Search for "New France"

Displaying 1-20 of 96 results
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Gaspé

It is one of the oldest settlements in North America: on 24 July 1534, Jacques Cartier took possession of Canada on behalf of the king of France and placed a cross at this location, which very soon became a fishing port and supply centre for New France.

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Chicoutimi

Chicoutimi was an important staging point on the route that 17th-century Indigenous hunters took to sell their furs in Tadoussac, and in 1676 New France authorities built a trading post here.

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Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures

The area was first settled in 1658, more than 20 years before the creation of the parish of Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures. The name Saint-Augustin was supposedly given to the parish in honour of the governor of New France from 1663-1665, Augustin de Saffray de MÉZY.

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New Westminster

New Westminster, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1860, population 70,996 (2016census), 65,976 (2011 census). The city of New Westminster is located on the north bank of the Fraser River, 20 km east of Vancouver. Governor James Douglas established New Westminster in 1859 as the capital of British Columbia. The Royal Engineers surveyed the city and Queen Victoria named it. As a result, New Westminster’s nickname is “The Royal City.” New Westminster is western Canada’s oldest city.

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Laval

Laval, Quebec, incorporated as a city in 1965, population 422,993 (2016 census), 401,553 (2011 census). Laval was formed by the merger of 14 municipalities: Chomedey, Duvernay, Laval-des-Rapides, Laval-Ouest, Pont-Viau, Sainte-Rose, Auteuil, Fabreville, Îles-Laval, Laval-sur-le-lac, Sainte-Dorothée, Saint-François, Saint-Vincent-de-Paul and Vimont. Laval is the third largest city in Quebec. It is located on Île Jésus, north of Île de Montréal. Laval is separated from Île de Montréal by the Rivière des Prairies and from the mainland to the north by the Rivière des Mille Îles. The city is named after François de Laval, the first Roman Catholic bishop of Quebec (1674-88) and onetime seigneur (1675-80) of Île Jésus.

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Charny

Charny's development is linked to the railway. Near the end of the 19th century, the Grand Trunk Railway and the Intercolonial Railway set up west of l'Hêtrière, a parcel of the seigneury de Lauzon. This area was referred to as Chaudière Junction, or West Junction.

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Montmagny

Jacques CARTIER passed Montmagny and its many offshore islands in 1535 and noted its beautiful surroundings. In 1646 a seigneury containing the area was granted to Huault, although permanent European habitation did not begin until the 1670s.

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Dauphin

Pierre de LA VÉRENDRYE first visited the area in the 1730s and gave the name Dauphin, for the eldest son of the king of France, to a post in the area (1741).

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Rouyn-Noranda

For many years, Noranda was completely controlled and administered by Noranda Mines, formed in 1922 to exploit one of the richest copper and gold deposits ever found in Canada. The name "Noranda" is a combination of the words "North" and "Canada.

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Québec City

Québec City, Québec, founded in 1608, population 531,902 (2016 c), 516,576 (2011 c). Québec City, the capital of the province of Québec, is located on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River where it meets the Rivière Saint-Charles. Here, the St. Lawrence narrows to a width of just over 1 km, and navigation is made difficult by a group of islands, the largest of which is Île d'Orléans. Cap-Diamant, a promontory with an elevation of 98 m, dominates the site and was used effectively as a fortification, earning Québec City the name "Gibraltar of North America." The name "Québec" is probably derived from an Algonquian word meaning "narrowing of the river."

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North Battleford

A new town site, named North Battleford, was laid out in 1905. The community grew rapidly with many businesses and residents abandoning the older community and moving to the new rail centre. By 1913 North Battleford was granted city status.

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Moncton

Moncton, NB, incorporated as a city in 1890, population 71,889 (2016 census),69,074 (2011 census), is the largest city in New Brunswick. The City of Moncton is located in eastern New Brunswick on a bend of the Petitcodiac River. With a population of 144,810 (2016) the Greater Moncton region includes the steadily growing city of Dieppe and the town of Riverview.

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Longueuil

Longueuil, Quebec, population 239,700 (2016 census), 231,409 (2011 census). Longueuil’s history dates to the 17th century with the settling of French colonists. It is today an important suburb of Montreal and is connected to the island of Montreal by the Jacques Cartier bridge and the Louis-Hippolyte-La Fontaine tunnel-bridge. Longueuil is criss-crossed by major expressways linking metropolitan Montreal to Québec city, the Eastern Townships and northern New York State. The municipality of Longueuil is its own entity within the Longueuil agglomeration which includes other nearby cities.

Longueuil is situated on the ancestral territory of the Kanyen’kehà:ka. The land remains unceded and is considered Indigenous territory.

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Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivières, Qué, City, pop 46 264 (2001c), 48 419 (1996c), 49 426 (1991c), 77.83 km2, inc 1857, the regional capital of Québec's Mauricie region, is located on the west shore of the mouth of Rivière Saint-Maurice​, midway between Québec City and Montréal. Its name derives from the 3-armed delta formed by the river's islands at its mouth.

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Bathurst

Bathurst, New Brunswick, incorporated as a city in 1966, population 11,897 (2016 census), 12,275 (2011 census). The City of Bathurst is situated on Bathurst Harbour, an estuary where the Nepisiguit River meets Chaleur Bay. Bathurst is the administrative, commercial, educational and cultural hub of northeastern New Brunswick. The city is part of the Chaleur Regional Service Commission along with the neighbouring municipalities of Beresford, Nigadoo, Petit-Rocher, Pointe-Verte and Belledune, and sits adjacent to the Pabineau First Nation.

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Saint John

Saint John, NB, incorporated as a city in 1785, population 67,575 (2016 census), 70,063 (2011 census). The City of Saint John, the second largest city in New Brunswick, is located at the mouth of the Saint John River on the Bay of Fundy.

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Jonquière

As the industrial axis of the region, its history is closely tied to the history of major corporations, specifically to that of the Price Company Ltd (now Abitibi-Price Inc) and Alcan. An agricultural parish founded in 1847, Jonquière began developing after 1893 when the railway arrived.

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Anjou

First part of the parish municipality of Saint-Léonard-de-Port-Maurice from 1886 to 1916, it was set up as a separate municipality in 1916 and incorporated as a city 50 years later.