Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 61-80 of 107 results
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Charlottetown

Charlottetown, PEI, incorporated as a city in 1855, population 36,094 (2016 c), 34,562 (2011 c). The capital of Prince Edward Island, the City of Charlottetown is also the administrative centre of Queens County and the principal municipality of Canada's smallest province. It is situated on a broad harbour opening into the Northumberland Strait. Three rivers converge there, with the city located on a low-rising point of land between the Hillsborough (East) and North (Yorke) rivers just opposite the harbour's mouth. Suburban development has spread across the Hillsborough to Stratford, and between the North and West (Eliot) rivers at Cornwall. Besides its governmental functions, Charlottetown services a considerable agricultural hinterland and is the focus of Island communications. Its favourable climate, nearby beaches and claim to be the “Birthplace of Confederation” have made it a major tourist centre.

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Vanier (Qué)

Vanier, Qué, City, pop 11 054 (2001c), 11 174 (1996c), 10 833(1991c), area 4.59 km2, inc 1916, was originally named Québec-Ouest until 1966, when it was changed to Vanier in honour of Governor-General Georges-Philéas VANIER.

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La Pocatière

In 1672, François Pollet de La Combe-Pocatière received the seigneurie de la Grande-Anse as a gift from his father-in-law, Nicholas Juchereau de Saint-Denys. This territory became the parish of Ste-Anne-de-La-Pocatière, and later, the city of La Pocatière.

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La Prairie

In 1836 the first Canadian railway, linking La Prairie with Saint-Jean, was inaugurated. After construction of the Victoria Bridge, goods trains coming from the east were diverted from the town.

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Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures

The area was first settled in 1658, more than 20 years before the creation of the parish of Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures. The name Saint-Augustin was supposedly given to the parish in honour of the governor of New France from 1663-1665, Augustin de Saffray de MÉZY.

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Wetaskiwin

Wetaskiwin, Alta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 12 525 (2011c), 11 689 (2006c). The City of Wetaskiwin is one of Alberta’s oldest cities. It began (1891) as Siding 16 on the Calgary-Edmonton Railway and was a point of departure for early, predominantly Scandinavian homesteaders.

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Clarence-Rockland

Clarence-Rockland, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1998, population 23 185 (2011c), 20 790 (2006c). The City of Clarence-Rockland is located on the OTTAWA RIVER 35 km east of OTTAWA.

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Pitt Meadows

Pitt Meadows, BC, incorporated as a city in 2007, population 17 736 (2011c), 15 623 (2006c). The City of Pitt Meadows is an agricultural community located in the lower Fraser Valley east of VANCOUVER on the north side of the FRASER RIVER at its junction with the Pitt River.

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Sainte-Thérèse

In 1714, Gaspard Piot de Langloiserie and his spouse, Marie-Thérèse du Gué, received the seigneury of Mille-Iles. In 1735 colonization occurred mainly through the efforts of the widow Marie-Thérèse du Gué and continued through her descendants.

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Bécancour

The city is named for René Robineau de Bécancour, who led an expedition against the Iroquois in 1696. The first French missionary contact with the local Abenaki occurred in 1669, and a permanent European settlement was established 3 years later.

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Varennes

Canada's largest concentration of researchers in the field of ENERGY is concentrated in Varennes.

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Lachine

The development of the Lachine Canal in the 1820s, the establishment of the Montreal and Lachine Railroad in 1847, and the expansion of the trucking business in the 20th century gave Lachine a major role in the trade network extending to southwestern Canada and the US.

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Rouyn-Noranda

For many years, Noranda was completely controlled and administered by Noranda Mines, formed in 1922 to exploit one of the richest copper and gold deposits ever found in Canada. The name "Noranda" is a combination of the words "North" and "Canada.

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Vaudreuil-Dorion

The area was granted to Philippe de Rigaud de VAUDREUIL in 1703. However, it was his successor, Michel Chartier de Lotbinière, who fostered the settlement and development of the seigneury that he had bought from the Vaudreuil family in 1763. The FUR TRADE and agriculture supported the local economy.

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Kamloops

Kamloops, BC, incorporated as a city in 1893, population 90,280 (2016 census), 85,678 (2011 census). The City of Kamloops amalgamated with North Kamloops in 1967 and in 1973 with surrounding residential areas to form the present city of Kamloops. It is located in southern British Columbia 355 km northeast of Vancouver via the Coquihalla highway. The city is situated at the confluence of the North and South Thompson rivers near their entrance into Kamloops Lake. The Kamloops Reserve 1, home to some members of the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation, is adjacent to the city, on the northeast corner of the river junction.

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Laterrière

The name was first applied to the township (1850) and then the parish (1882). They were named after Marc-Pascal de Sales Laterrière, who represented Saguenay in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.

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Cranbrook

Cranbrook, BC, incorporated as a city in 1905, population 19 319 (2011c), 18 329 (2006c). The City of Cranbrook lies near the western edge of the ROCKY MOUNTAIN TRENCH, in the Kootenay region, 845 km east of Vancouver.

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LaSalle

History In 1667, René-Robert Cavelier de la Salle became seigneur of the land of present-day LaSalle. In order to avoid the Lachine Rapids, traders, explorers and Indigenous people portaged along a path that would become LaSalle Boulevard.

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Châteauguay

The name is a throwback to the seigneury of Châteauguay granted to Charles LE MOYNE in 1673. The seigneury was first known as "chasteau de Guay," a combination of Le Moyne's fortified manor or chasteau (château), and the name Gué or Guay, of the caretaker. It eventually became today's Châteauguay.