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Beneficial Insect

Most insects are beneficial, playing many ecological roles. Less than 1% are pests. They are the principal food of many birds and reptiles, and the survival of insect-pollinated plants depends on them.

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Forest

Main Forest TypesWorldwide there are 3 main forest types related directly to climatic zones: equatorial- and tropical-region forests, temperate-zone forests, and forests associated with colder climates.

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Artiodactyla

Artiodactyla is an order of even-toed mammals that walk on their toenails (unguis). This and the other order of hoofed mammals, the Perissodactyla, are collectively called ungulates.

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Mint

Mint belongs to the mint family (Lamiaceae, also called Labiatae), a large plant family that also includes several aromatic and ornamental plants like basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme, coleus and sage.

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Cape St Mary

Cape St Mary forms the southern boundary of St Mary's Bay in an area of Nova Scotia's northwestern coast known as the French Shore. Fishing is the principal activity in this region; the cape was once the site of the International Tuna Cup matches.

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Goldeye

The goldeye (Hiodon alosoides) [Lat alosoides, "shadlike"] is a relatively small, opportunistic foraging freshwater fish of the family Hiodontidae (order Osteoglossiformes).

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Bison Farming

In the early 1800s it is reported that over 50 million bison roamed the plains of North America. In the late 1800s, as a consequence of hunting for meat, hides and trophies, and conversion of natural grass to farmland, there were fewer than 1000 plains bison remaining.

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Planet and Satellite

The diameter of a world is a significant value because, given the same densities, the surface gravity will vary roughly with the diameter. A diameter of 350 km is the approximate dividing line between the larger, near-spherical bodies and the smaller objects of irregular shape.

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Allison Pass

Allison Pass, elevation 1,352 metres, is located at kilometre 60, the highest point on the Hope-Princeton Highway (opened 1949) through the Cascade Mountains of southern British Columbia.

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Alfalfa

Alfalfa, or lucerne (genus Medicago), is a herbaceous perennial belonging to the legume family and grown as a forage crop.

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Amphibian

Amphibians are members of a group of tetrapod (4-legged) vertebrate animals derived from fishes, and are the common ancestor to mammals and reptiles.

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Boundaries

The political boundaries that are of concern to Canada today are the international boundaries primarily with the US and Greenland and, because they are of more than local importance, the boundaries of the provinces and territories. The evolution of both types involved 2 distinct stages. After political decisions were made on the allocation of territory, such territories were delimited and the boundaries described in state documents. Then, usually some time later, the boundaries were surveyed and marked on the ground (the process of demarcation).

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Québec's Postglacial Seas

Between about 100 000 and 12 000 years ago, the whole area of Québec as well as a major part of the northern hemisphere was covered with a thick layer of ice. In the late PLEISTOCENE era, just over 12 000 years ago, Québec underwent a gradual warming of the atmosphere.

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Hurricane Hazel

Hurricane Hazel struck the Toronto area on 15-16 October 1954, with devastating results. It was Canada's worst hurricane and Toronto's worst natural disaster. During the storm, winds reached 124 km/h and over 200 millimetres of rain fell in just 24 hours.

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Ice-Worm

Ice-Worm is a common name for Mesenchytraeus solifugus, a dark-pigmented oligochaete worm (see Annelida) up to 4 cm long, found in tangled masses in the melting ice of glaciers in the Pacific Northwest.