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Cape Bonavista Lighthouse

CAPE BONAVISTA separates Trinity and Bonavista bays on the eastern coast of Newfoundland. In 1842 it was decided to build a LIGHTHOUSE there as an aid to navigating the dangerous seas off the cape. The lighthouse operated for well over a century before it finally closed in 1962.

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Montréal Biodôme

Opened in 1992 and located in the former Olympic velodrome, the Montréal Biodôme is part of the “Space for Life” network, which includes Montréal’s Insectarium, Planetarium and Botanical Garden.

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Deer

Deer (Cervidae) is a family of antlered, hoofed ruminants of the order Artiodactyla containing about 40 species worldwide.

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Historic Gardens

 Gardens can be viewed, studied and understood as cultural landscapes. Their aesthetic, horticultural, historic and environmental richness as well as their evocative power excite wonder and delight.

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Bunting

Bunting is a common name for several not particularly closely related members of the order Passeriformes (perching birds).

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Reservoir

Reservoirs, as discussed here, do not include any type of subsurface reservoir structure that stores water, natural gas or oil.

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Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion and false-scorpion are the common names for tiny creatures in the class Arachnida, order Pseudoscorpiones (or Pseudoscorpionida).

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Chipmunk

Chipmunk, diminutive member of the squirrel family belonging to genus Tamias.

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Reforestation

Many people believe a new sapling must be planted to replace every tree that is harvested. In fact, the FOREST regenerates naturally. After logging, young shoots grow and develop quickly because they have more room and good exposure to sunlight.

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Sea Otter

Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris), largest and most marine weasel, lives exclusively in shallow seas of the N Pacific, formerly from Japan to California.

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Buttercup

Buttercup is a common name for several herbaceous plants of the genus Ranunculus, family Ranunculaceae.

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Resource Towns

Resource towns, or "new towns," are the small, isolated communities built around resource-based industries and transportation, such as mining towns, mill towns, railway towns and fishing villages. Examples include: Fort McMurray, Alberta (oil); Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland (pulp and paper); Glace Bay, Nova Scotia (coal); Black's Harbour, New Brunswick (fish packing); Murdochville, Québec (copper); Elliot Lake, Ontario (uranium); Snow Lake, Manitoba (copper, zinc); and Kitimat, British Columbia (aluminum). Resource development has long been recognized as a significant factor in shaping patterns of Canadian development. It has been argued that all Canadian urban growth ultimately depends on the production of staple products. Resource towns have been important agencies in this process of staple exploitation. Because of their dependence on single industries, the economies of resource towns are often unstable and precarious.

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Wind-scorpion

Wind-scorpions are spiderlike and hairy. Their most striking feature is the enormous chelicerae, which are often about 25% of their body length.

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Lupine

Lupine (Latin lupus, "wolf," from the belief that it robs the soil), is the common name for several annual or perennial herbaceous plant species in the pea family.

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Trillium

Trillium, common and generic name of a perennial plant of the Trilliaceae family (sometimes classified as a subfamily of the LILY family). The name derives from the arrangement of leaves, petals and sepals in groups of 3. The

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Geological Regions

Based on geological history, Canada can be divided into six regions, each characterized by a distinctive landscape: the Canadian Shield, Interior Platform, Appalachian Orogen, Innuitian Orogen, Cordillera and Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, and the Eastern Continental Margin.

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Geological Survey of Canada

The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) is Canada's national agency for geoscientific information and research. It studies and reports on Canada’s geology, natural geological hazards, and the development of natural resources. Established in 1842 primarily to promote the mining industry, it is one of the country’s oldest scientific organizations. Throughout its history, the Survey has produced some of the most comprehensive and detailed maps of the Canadian landscape, and published several important reports on its ecology and natural history.

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Mole

Mole, common name for 20-29 species of predominantly burrowing insectivores of family Talpidae restricted to Eurasia and N America. Six species occur in Canada.

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