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Scotian Shelf

Scotian Shelf, a 700 km section of the Continental Shelf off Nova Scotia. Bounded by the Laurentian Channel on the NE, and Northeast Channel and the Gulf of Maine on the SW, it varies in width from 120 to 240 km; the average depth is 90 m.

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Scallop

Scallop is a bivalve (hinged shell) mollusc of suborder Pectinina. Scallops are found in all seas.

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Solomon's Seal

Solomon's seal (genus Polygonatum) is a herbaceous plant of lily family (Liliaceae). About 50 species occur in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Rupert's Land

Rupert’s Land was a vast territory of northern wilderness. It represented a third of what is now Canada. From 1670 to 1870, it was the exclusive commercial domain of the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) and the primary trapping grounds of the fur trade. The territory was named after Prince Rupert, the HBC’s first governor. Three years after Confederation, the Government of Canada acquired Rupert’s Land from the HBC for $1.5-million. It is the largest real estate transaction (by land area) in the country’s history. The purchase of Rupert’s Land transformed Canada geographically. It changed from a modest country in the northeast of the continent into an expansive one that reached across North America. Rupert’s Land was eventually divided among Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

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Cultivated Rose

Roses have been cultivated from very early times, but little is known of their origin. The hybrid tea rose, the most popular of modern garden roses, was introduced worldwide in 1867.

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Seaweeds

Seaweeds are multicellular marine algae, visible to the naked eye. They extend from the uppermost reaches of sea spray on the shore to the lower limits of light beneath the surface of the water.

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Salmon

The salmon is a family of fish, Salmonidae [Lat salire, "to leap"], with soft fin rays, a short dorsal fin, an adipose (fatty) fin, and teeth in the jaws.

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Shearwater

The shearwater (order Procellariiformes, family Procellariidae) is a medium-sized seabird.

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Rutabaga

Rutabaga (Brassica napus, Napobrassica Group), herbaceous biennial vegetable belonging to the Cruciferae family and grown as a root crop in all provinces.

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Rhubarb

Rhubarb (genus Rheum) is a common name for about 50 species of cool-season herbaceous perennial plants belonging to the buckwheat family and originating in central Asia.

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Sagebrush

The greatest variety of native sagebrushes occurs in the western mountains, where species that range from Alaska to California and Colorado are found. Several species range across the prairies and 2 species are transcontinental in Canada. Sagebrushes grow on dry plains, hills and rocky slopes.

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Sand and Gravel

Sand and gravel are unconsolidated, granular mineral materials produced by the natural disintegration of rock caused by weathering. The terms sand, gravel, clay and silt relate to grain size rather than composition. Sand is material passing through a number 4 (4.

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Slug

Slug is a common name for several terrestrial pulmonate and numerous marine gilled species of gastropod molluscs conspicuous by the lack of an exposed shell.

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Whale

 Whale, common name for large, aquatic or marine mammals of order Cetacea, which inhabit all oceans.

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Thrips

Thrips, order Thysanoptera (Gk for "fringe-wings"), are among the smallest insects, being slender and usually less than 2 mm long.