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Sedge

Sedge is a grasslike plant common throughout temperate and cold regions. The genus name, Carex (family Cyperaceae), is probably derived from keiro, referring to the sharp leaf margins.

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Winter Solstice

About 30 minutes in length, the work has three movements: I The Darkest Hour, II Simulacrum, III The Prophet of Light. Hatzis explains that the title refers to the spiritual meaning of the "longest night" and that the work "...is a meditation on our own times ...

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Racoon

Racoon was a 26-gun British sloop of war sent to seize Astoria, the American Pacific Fur Company post at the Columbia River mouth, and to establish an outpost there during the War of 1812.

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Cod

Cod, common name for fishes of class Actinopterygii, order Gadiformes, family Gadidae.

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January Thaw

January thaw, or bonspiel thaw as it is called on the Prairies, is a climatic phenomenon of unseasonably warm weather that tends to occur at about the same time every year, usually within about 10 days after the middle of January.

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Cetacea

Cetacea, order of mammals consisting of whales, dolphins and porpoises. It includes about 80 living species, with worldwide distribution.

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Medicinal Crops

About a third of the world's estimated 400 000 species of higher or vascular plants have probably been used for medicinal purposes by indigenous societies, generally in a raw or minimally processed form.

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Nuthatch

The nuthatch (Sittidae) family consists of small, tree-climbing birds with a short tail, pointed bill and long, sturdy toes and claws

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Winter

Winter occurs as the Earth's axis tilts away from the sun during the planet's annual rotation. The portion of the Earth that is furthest from the sun experiences winter, with weather that is colder than the other seasons. In the Northern Hemisphere, winter officially begins with the winter solstice, around 21 December, and ends at the spring equinox, around 21 March. Winter figures largely in Canada's climate, cultural experience and mythology. Every aspect of life in Canada is affected by winter, whether by heavy rains on the West Coast, isolation during the long Arctic winters, raging blizzards across the prairies or huge snowfalls in eastern Canada. Winter is reflected in Canadian art, literature, music, fashion, pastimes and attitudes.

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Game Bird

Game bird is not a scientific term, but refers to any bird that is hunted. There are 2 categories in Canada, migratory and nonmigratory.

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Bear (Animal)

Bears (of the family Ursidae) are stocky, bob-tailed mammals with 5 clawed toes on each paw. Three species inhabit Canada.

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Bobcat

The bobcat (Felis rufus, family Felidae) is a medium-sized, carnivorous mammal, also known as wildcat or bay lynx.

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Carnivora

Carnivora is an order of flesh-eating mammals, which includes terrestrial and aquatic families.

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Cougar

Cougar, puma or mountain lion (Felis concolor, family Felidae), is the most gracile of the New World wild cats.

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Chickadee

Chickadees (genus, Poecile) are small birds, which live in woodlands throughout Canada, often visiting backyard birdfeeders.

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Bird

 A Bird is a member of a unique group of vertebrates, Class Aves. The fossil record, comparative anatomy and embryology indicate that Birds have a common ancestry with Reptiles and Dinosaurs.

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Turtle Island

For some Indigenous peoples, Turtle Island refers to the continent of North America. The name comes from various Indigenous oral histories that tell stories of a turtle that holds the world on its back. For some Indigenous peoples, the turtle is therefore considered an icon of life, and the story of Turtle Island consequently speaks to various spiritual and cultural beliefs.

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Trilobite

Trilobitesare an extinct marine arthropod of the Palaeozoic era (544-300 million years ago). Its closest modern relative is the horseshoe crab.