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Pitcher Plant

Tropical Asian and N Australian pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes belong to the family Nepenthaceae. The Australian flycatcher (Cephalotus follicularis) of SW Australia is the only species of the family Cephalotaceae.

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Plankton

Plankton [Gk planktos, "drifting"], plants and animals, phytoplankton and zooplankton, respectively, that float freely or drift with currents in oceans, freshwater ponds and lakes.

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Plant Classification

Popular classification usually divides living beings into plants and animals and, sometimes, microbes. Scientific classification long followed a similar system, with 2 principal kingdoms: the animal order and the vegetable order.

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Poison Ivy

Poison ivy plants can spread by underground stems or seeds. Most are small shrubs (0.5-1 m tall); others are vinelike plants, 15 m or longer, supported by aerial roots. Shrubby forms are sometimes called poison oak.

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Puffin

Puffin is a common name for 3 species of medium-sized seabirds of the Auk family.

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Purple Martin

The purple martin (Progne subis), is the largest (14.4-14.9 cm) and most urbanized of Canadian swallows, and is the northernmost representative of an otherwise tropical New World genus.

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Sulphur

In Canada, elemental sulphur is recovered from the processing of sour natural gas with a high hydrogen sulphide (H2S) content, and from the refining of high sulphur-bearing crude and heavy oil.

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Herbarium

A herbarium (Lat herba, "herb," formerly any medicinal plant) is a collection of dried specimens of plants mounted on sheets of heavy paper and stored in cabinets or bound in book form, as well as the building that houses such a collection.

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Butterfly

Butterfly, term referring to insects of order Lepidoptera [Gk "scaly wings"]. The Canadian fauna includes 272 known species, compared to 695 known from North America as a whole, and over 20 000 worldwide.

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Beluga Whale

The beluga, or white whale, is a type of toothed whale found in Canada’s Arctic, Hudson Bay and St. Lawrence estuary.

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Hagfish

Hagfish, group of primitive vertebrates which together with lampreys and various extinct forms comprise the fish class Agnatha.

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Potash

Potash is an alkaline potassium compound most commonly used in fertilizers. It refers to a variety of salts produced through mining of minerals and chemical manufacturing. Canada is the world's largest potash producer and exporter.

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Beneficial Insect

Most insects are beneficial, playing many ecological roles. Less than 1% are pests. They are the principal food of many birds and reptiles, and the survival of insect-pollinated plants depends on them.

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Forest

Main Forest TypesWorldwide there are 3 main forest types related directly to climatic zones: equatorial- and tropical-region forests, temperate-zone forests, and forests associated with colder climates.

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Artiodactyla

Artiodactyla is an order of even-toed mammals that walk on their toenails (unguis). This and the other order of hoofed mammals, the Perissodactyla, are collectively called ungulates.

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Mint

Mint belongs to the mint family (Lamiaceae, also called Labiatae), a large plant family that also includes several aromatic and ornamental plants like basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme, coleus and sage.

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Cape St Mary

Cape St Mary forms the southern boundary of St Mary's Bay in an area of Nova Scotia's northwestern coast known as the French Shore. Fishing is the principal activity in this region; the cape was once the site of the International Tuna Cup matches.

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Goldeye

The goldeye (Hiodon alosoides) [Lat alosoides, "shadlike"] is a relatively small, opportunistic foraging freshwater fish of the family Hiodontidae (order Osteoglossiformes).

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Bison Farming

In the early 1800s it is reported that over 50 million bison roamed the plains of North America. In the late 1800s, as a consequence of hunting for meat, hides and trophies, and conversion of natural grass to farmland, there were fewer than 1000 plains bison remaining.

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