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Shrike

Shrike is the common name for the family Laniidae of singing birds.

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Beekeeping

The complex social organization, the biology and the industrious nature of honeybees (genus Apis) have long fascinated people.

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Beetle

Beetles are an extremely diverse group of insects, which together make up the order Coleoptera (from Greek koleos, meaning, “sheath,” and ptera, “wings”). So named for their hardened forewings, which conceal a second pair of flight wings, beetles have the greatest number of known species of any comparable group of living things. There are an estimated 380,000 described beetle species worldwide, representing about 40 per cent of the world’s known insects. Beetles occupy nearly every available terrestrial and freshwater habitat, having evolved to fulfill more ecological roles than probably any other group of organisms. As such, beetles are found all over the world. In Canada, over 8,150 species are known, representing 121 of the world’s 176 families of beetles. Familiar beetles include lady beetles, fireflies, scarabs, weevils, tiger, ground, blister and leaf beetles.

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Bat

 Bats are nocturnal mammals of the order Chiroptera (literally "hand wing"). Bats are the only flying mammals. Most bats in Canada are plain-nosed (family Vespertilionidae).

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Peach

The peach (Prunus persica) is the most widely grown stone fruit. It is native to China and was introduced to Europe 2,000 years ago. Peaches are now grown in temperate zones, worldwide.

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Yarrow

Yellowish disc florets (3-10) make up the central part, which is surrounded by 5 petal-shaped ray florets. They bloom from May to October. Yarrow has a dry, one-seeded fruit. Throughout the ages, yarrow has been used to stop blood flow, hence one common name, "nosebleed.

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Ecosystem

    A limited space within which living beings interact with nonliving matter at a high level of interdependence to form an environmental unit is called an ecosystem.

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Gentian

Several plants of family Gentianaceae, of the genus Gentiana, are commonly known as gentian.

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Graphite

Natural graphite appears to have been created through the decomposition of organic material contained in LIMESTONE during metamorphism. The 3 main types of natural graphite are microcrystalline (known commercially as amorphous), crystalline flake and lump graphite.

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Bass

Bass, name applied to members of 4 fish families: temperate bass (Moronidae); sunfish (Centrarchidae); temperate ocean bass (Acropomatidae); and sea bass (Serranidae).

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Bird Flight

Wing evolution has been affected by the habitats to which birds have adapted (e.g. the open ocean, cliff tops or the closed environment of forests) and by the need to reduce drag, or air resistance.

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Pitcher Plant

Tropical Asian and N Australian pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes belong to the family Nepenthaceae. The Australian flycatcher (Cephalotus follicularis) of SW Australia is the only species of the family Cephalotaceae.

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Plankton

Plankton [Gk planktos, "drifting"], plants and animals, phytoplankton and zooplankton, respectively, that float freely or drift with currents in oceans, freshwater ponds and lakes.

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Plant Classification

Popular classification usually divides living beings into plants and animals and, sometimes, microbes. Scientific classification long followed a similar system, with 2 principal kingdoms: the animal order and the vegetable order.

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Poison Ivy

Poison ivy plants can spread by underground stems or seeds. Most are small shrubs (0.5-1 m tall); others are vinelike plants, 15 m or longer, supported by aerial roots. Shrubby forms are sometimes called poison oak.

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Puffin

Puffin is a common name for 3 species of medium-sized seabirds of the Auk family.

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Purple Martin

The purple martin (Progne subis), is the largest (14.4-14.9 cm) and most urbanized of Canadian swallows, and is the northernmost representative of an otherwise tropical New World genus.