Search for ""

Displaying 381-400 of 898 results
Article

Rat Control in Alberta

Rat control in Alberta is administered and co-ordinated by Alberta Agriculture and Food. It was established in 1950 to keep Alberta free of Norway rats (seeRAT), which were introduced to the east coast of North America in 1775

Article

Raven

The raven is a large, black bird with a purplish lustre, belonging, like the crow, to the genus Corvus.

Article

Grouse

The Grouse (Tetraonidae) is a small subfamily (18 species) of chickenlike birds with circumpolar distribution above latitude 26° north.

Article

Borden Island

Borden Island, 2794 km2, is one of the Queen Elizabeth group of islands in the High Arctic. Most of the island is part of the Northwest Territories; the easternmost part of the island is part of Nunavut.

Article

Wheat

Wheat is the common name for members of genus Triticum of the grass family (Gramineae) and for the cereal grains produced by these grasses.

Article

Finch

Finch is a common name for one of the larger bird families, Fringillidae, which occurs worldwide (introduced in Australia). It includes some GROSBEAKS, crossbills, Hawaiian honey creepers, redpolls, siskins and birds specifically named finches.

Article

Pigeon

The pigeon (Columbidae) is a large family (303 species) of birds, many of which are called doves, distributed throughout temperate and tropical areas worldwide.

Article

Bluebell

Bluebell, common name for several plants with bell-shaped flowers of Campanulaceae and Boraginaceae families.

Article

Seashell

Shell is a hard covering made primarily of calcium carbonate, secreted by invertebrate animals (eg, molluscs, barnacles, sea urchins).

Article

Scotian Shelf

Scotian Shelf, a 700 km section of the Continental Shelf off Nova Scotia. Bounded by the Laurentian Channel on the NE, and Northeast Channel and the Gulf of Maine on the SW, it varies in width from 120 to 240 km; the average depth is 90 m.

Article

Scallop

Scallop is a bivalve (hinged shell) mollusc of suborder Pectinina. Scallops are found in all seas.

Article

Solomon's Seal

Solomon's seal (genus Polygonatum) is a herbaceous plant of lily family (Liliaceae). About 50 species occur in the Northern Hemisphere.

Article

Rupert's Land

Rupert’s Land was a vast territory of northern wilderness. It represented a third of what is now Canada. From 1670 to 1870, it was the exclusive commercial domain of the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) and the primary trapping grounds of the fur trade. The territory was named after Prince Rupert, the HBC’s first governor. Three years after Confederation, the Government of Canada acquired Rupert’s Land from the HBC for $1.5-million. It is the largest real estate transaction (by land area) in the country’s history. The purchase of Rupert’s Land transformed Canada geographically. It changed from a modest country in the northeast of the continent into an expansive one that reached across North America. Rupert’s Land was eventually divided among Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Article

Cultivated Rose

Roses have been cultivated from very early times, but little is known of their origin. The hybrid tea rose, the most popular of modern garden roses, was introduced worldwide in 1867.

Article

Seaweeds

Seaweeds are multicellular marine algae, visible to the naked eye. They extend from the uppermost reaches of sea spray on the shore to the lower limits of light beneath the surface of the water.