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Soybean

Soybean (Glycine max) is a herbaceous annual belonging to the legume family, grown as an oilseed crop in Canada.

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Squid

Squid are decapods ("10-footed") molluscs of class Cephalopoda. Squid are usually of the order Teuthoidea).

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Silver

Important producing countries now are Mexico, Peru, the Commonwealth of Independent States, the US, Canada, Australia, Chile, Poland and China. Photographic films and papers account for about 25% of the demand for silver.

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Snipe

Snipe is the name given to 19 species of small to medium-sized shorebirds (254-406 mm) of the sandpiper family.

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Stonefly

Stonefly is the common name for small to medium-sized, usually brown, aquatic insects of order Plecoptera.

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Weasel

The weasel is a small, long-bodied, carnivorous mammal of the family Mustelidae. Three species of weasels are found in Canada: the short-tailed weasel, also known as the ermine or stoat (Mustela erminea), the long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata), and the least weasel (Mustela nivalis). The least weasel is the smallest species in the order carnivora. The genus Mustela also includes mink, black-footed ferret, and the introduced European ferret.

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Titanium

Titanium (Ti) is a metallic element estimated to form about 0.5% of the rocks of the Canadian SHIELD. Titanium minerals of commercial importance include the dioxides rutile and anatase, which are polymorphs of TiO2 and ilmenite (FeO.TiO2), a mineral that contains 52.7% TiO2.

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Tobacco

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is an annual (potentially perennial) herbaceous plant of the nightshade family.

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Thrasher

Thrashers (Mimidae) are a small family of slender, long-tailed, medium-sized, insectivorous and frugivorous birds with loud, musical, repetitive songs.

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Tobacco-Products Industry

Although Canada's tobacco industry has developed largely during this century, tobacco growing goes back to early colonial days, when settlers around the St Lawrence River adopted the smoking customs of aboriginal peoples. French settlers began by copying the agricultural model set by the Indians.

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Tidal Energy

Tidal energy is a largely untapped, renewable energy source based largely on lunar gravitation. While the potential of tidal hydroelectricity has long been recognized, compared to river dams, tidal power projects are expensive because massive structures must be built in difficult saltwater environments.

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Thunderstorm

Thunderstorms usually occur on summer afternoons. While a thunderstorm typically affects a given locality for only an hour or so during its passage overhead, the entire lifetime may be as long as 6-10 hours, along a pathway of several hundred kilometres.

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Sumac

Sumac is a shrub of the genus Rhus of the family Anacardiaceae.

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Swift

Swift is a common name for about 100 species of birds in 2 closely related families (Apodidae, Hemiprocnidae).

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Thistle

The thistle (Carduaceae tribe, family Compositae or Asteraceae) is a spiny herbaceous plant with white or purple flowers. There are 800 species worldwide, 46 in Canada (15 native). Native species (none serious WEEDS) are mainly "true" or "plumed" thistles of genus Cirsium.

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Toad

Toad is a common name for certain members of the amphibian order Anura, the frogs.

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Turnip

Turnip (Brassica rapa, Rapifera Group), biennial vegetable belonging to the Cruciferae family and grown in all provinces as a root crop.

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Triticale

Triticale (Triticosecale Wittmack), the first man-made crop species, is initially produced by crossing wheat (genus Triticum) with rye (Secale), and resembles wheat.

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Trout

Trout is the common name given to the species of freshwater fish from 3 genera, all members of the salmon family (Salmonidae).

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Vegetable

A vegetable is a herbaceous plant of which all or a part is eaten, raw or cooked. Vegetables are a valuable source of protein, vitamins, minerals, trace elements and fibre. All vegetables are high in carbohydrates, which contribute to their unique taste.