Search for "black history"

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Tern

 The tern is a medium-sized bird of the GULL family. Terns are usually grey and white; in spring and summer most species have a black cap. Similar to gulls in appearance, terns differ in having more pointed wings and usually a noticeably forked tail.

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Bird Sanctuaries and Reserves

Protection may be achieved by various means, including land-use zoning, long-term agreements with landowners and outright acquisition of land by wildlife agencies. Protected land areas may be designated as national wildlife areas, conservation areas, game reserves, etc.

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Fly

Adult flies have sucking or piercing mouth parts and lack the mandibles with which other insects bite food. Many so called "biting flies" (eg, horseflies, mosquitoes, no-see-ums, black flies, stable flies, tse-tse flies) feed on VERTEBRATE blood.

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Holly

Holly, common name for shrub of the holly family Aquifoliaceae. The true hollies belong to genus Ilex, comprising some 400 species worldwide, mostly in Central and South America.

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Dairy Farming

About 60% of the milk produced is processed into butter, cheese and skim milk powder; the remainder is consumed in liquid form.

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Meteors, Meteorites and Impact Craters

The solar system contains many objects smaller than the planets (or their satellites) travelling in individual orbits about the SUN; space between the planets also contains myriad dust grains in the micron size range. Near Earth, dust concentrations are only a few hundred particles per cubic kilometre, but 35 000 to 100 000 t of extraterrestrial material enters the atmosphere annually, swept up by our planet from debris that is in its path or crosses its path.

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Gull

The gull (Laridae) family consists of long-winged, web-footed birds containing 2 subfamilies: Larinae and Sterninae.

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Swift

Swift is a common name for about 100 species of birds in 2 closely related families (Apodidae, Hemiprocnidae).

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Boreal Zone

The boreal zone is Canada’s largest vegetation zone, making up 55 per cent of the country’s land mass. It extends from Yukon and northern British Columbia in the west to Newfoundland and Labrador in the east. While much of the region is covered by forest, it also includes lakes, rivers, wetlands and naturally treeless areas. The boreal zone is home to diverse wildlife, and is crucial to maintaining biological diversity, storing carbon, purifying air and water, and regulating the climate. With more than 2.5 million Canadians living in the boreal zone, the forest also provides these rural communities with jobs and economic stability.

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Nightshade

Eight species of Solanum occur in Canada, of which only S. carolinense (horse or ball nettle), found in southern Ontario, is native. The most familiar nightshade found across Canada is S. dulcamara (climbing nightshade or European bittersweet).

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Heron

The heron (Ardeidae) family of birds comprises 60 species worldwide, 12 in Canada (including true herons, egrets, night herons and bitterns).

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Faba Bean

The faba Bean, or broad bean (Vicia faba or Faba vulgaris), is a legume family member, which is not a true bean but a vetch.

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Ash

Ash (Fraxinus), genus of trees or shrubs of olive family (Oleaceae). About 60 species occur worldwide, primarily in cold temperate regions; 4 are native to Canada.

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Marine Disasters

​Over the course of Canada’s history, marine disasters have occurred along the country’s coasts as well as in its freshwater lakes.

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Lichen

The more conspicuous lichens are foliose, lobed or leafy with distinct upper and lower surfaces; or fruticose, hanging like black or yellow hair from trees or shrubby and erect on the ground. Crustose lichens form a thin crust over rocks or bark and are conspicuous only if brightly coloured.

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Blackbird

Blackbird is a common name for several species of birds of the New World family Icteridae (which also includes meadowlarks, orioles, cowbirds and grackles).

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Auk

Alcidae is a family of highly specialized seabirds that contains auks (including the now extinct great auk), auklets, murres, murrelets, razorbills, dovekies, guillemots and puffins.