Search for "black history"

Displaying 101-120 of 322 results
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Pear

The pear (genus Pyrus) is a common name for over 20 species of fruit-bearing and ornamental trees of the rose family.

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Solomon's Seal

Solomon's seal (genus Polygonatum) is a herbaceous plant of lily family (Liliaceae). About 50 species occur in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Ant

Ant, common name for small, mostly ground-dwelling social insects of family Formicidae, order Hymenoptera.

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Gold

Gold (Au) is a bright, shiny, yellow metal, notable for its high density (19.3 times the weight of an equal volume of water) and valued for its extreme ductility, strong resistance to corrosion, lustrous beauty and scarcity.

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Dipper

The dipper (Cinclidae) family of birds comprises 5 species of birds known colloquially as water ouzel.

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House Sparrow

The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) is a small, granivorous and insectivorous songbird with conical bill and chunky body.

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Buckwheat

Buckwheat (genus Fagopyrum), broad-leaved, erect annual belonging to the buckwheat family (Polygonaceae).

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Plum

Plum is a common name for certain members of genus Prunus of the rose family, which produce a smooth-skinned, elliptical, heart-shaped, oblong, ovate or round fruit with a flat seed.

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Pipit

Pipit is the common name for some birds of the family Motacillidae, which also includes wagtails.

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Cultivated Rose

Roses have been cultivated from very early times, but little is known of their origin. The hybrid tea rose, the most popular of modern garden roses, was introduced worldwide in 1867.

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Turnip

Turnip (Brassica rapa, Rapifera Group), biennial vegetable belonging to the Cruciferae family and grown in all provinces as a root crop.

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Starling

Starling is the common name for an Old World family (Sturnidae) of birds, comprising 114 principally tropical species.

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Herbs

Herbs and spices differ largely by usage. Spices are normally more aromatic than herbs, and are often of tropical origin. They may consist of seeds, bark, flower buds, fruits, etc. Herbs are usually leafy and locally grown, and their use extends far back into history.

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Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle, common name for plants, usually woodland shrubs, of genus Lonicera, family Caprifoliaceae.

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Grouse

The Grouse (Tetraonidae) is a small subfamily (18 species) of chickenlike birds with circumpolar distribution above latitude 26° north.

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Aphid

Aphid, or plant louse, small, soft-bodied insect that sucks plant sap. Aphids belong to order Hemiptera, suborder Homoptera.

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Rodentia

Rodentia, largest and most common order of mammals, including 29 families, 418 genera and 1793 species. In Canada, 68 of the 163 species of terrestrial mammals are rodents.

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Pesticide

Substances used to control pests include insecticides (for control of insects), fungicides (for disease-causing fungi), herbicides (for weeds), rodenticides (for rodents), avicides (for birds), piscicides (for fish) and nematicides (for nematodes).

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Rocky Mountain Trench

The Rocky Mountain Trench is a long and deep valley extending approximately 1,500 km from the Bitterroot Valley in northwest Montana through British Columbia to the Liard Plain just south of the Yukon Territory. Its predominantly flat floor is 3–20 km wide and ranges in elevation between 600 m and 1,000 m above sea level. With walls made of sedimentary, volcanic and igneous rock, the Trench is sometimes referred to as the “Valley of a Thousand Peaks” because of the towering mountain ranges on either side: the Rocky Mountains to the east and the Columbia, Omineca and Cassiar mountains to the west. Humans have relied on the rich resources provided by this distinctive landscape from pre-colonial times to the present.