Search for ""

Displaying 5681-5700 of 5830 results
Article

Documenting the First World War

The First World War forever changed Canada. Some 630,000 Canadians enlisted from a nation of not yet eight million. More than 66,000 were killed. As the casualties mounted on the Western Front, an expatriate Canadian, Sir Max Aitken (Lord Beaverbrook), organized a program to document Canada’s war effort through art, photography and film. This collection of war art, made both in an official capacity and by soldiers themselves, was another method of forging a legacy of Canada’s war effort.

Article

Editorial: Canadian Art and the Great War

Canadian painting in the 19th century tended towards the pastoral. It depicted idyllic scenes of rural life and represented the country as a wondrous Eden. Canadian painter Homer Watson, under the influence of such American masters as Frederic Edwin Church and Albert Bierstadt, created images that are serene and suffused with golden light. In On the Mohawk River (1878), for instance, a lazy river ambles between tall, overhanging trees; in the background is a light-struck mountain. In Watson’s world, nature is peaceful, unthreatening and perhaps even sacred.

Article

Zoe Caldwell

Zoe Ada Caldwell, OBE, actor, director (born 14 September 1933 in Hawthorn, Australia; died 16 February 2020 in Pound Ridge, New York). Zoe Caldwell was an Australian actor who began her career in England before moving to Canada in 1961. She became a prominent leading lady in Canadian theatre, starring in productions at the Stratford Festival, the Shaw Festival and the Manitoba Theatre Centre, as well as on CBC TV. She began performing in the United States in the 1960s and went on to win four Tony Awards, including three for plays produced by her husband, Montreal-born theatre producer Robert Whitehead. Caldwell was also an accomplished director. Her renown as an actor in both classical and modern productions garnered her the Theatre World Award (1966), the Order of the British Empire (1970) and the Bernard B. Jacobs Excellence in Theatre Award (1999).

Article

Félix Leclerc

Félix Eugène Leclerc, OC, GOQ, singer-songwriter, poet, novelist, playwright, actor, broadcaster (born 2 August 1914 at La Tuque, QC; died 8 August 1988 at Ȋle d'Orléans, QC). Félix Leclerc was a revolutionary artist whose work in several fields marked a turning point in Quebec culture. As a poet and playwright, he was one of Quebec’s literary giants. As a singer, he was a superstar in Canada and Europe, particularly in France. He greatly influenced the course of the Québec chanson and paved the way for the popular chansonnier movement in Quebec and France. He was a vocal proponent of Quebec nationalism and helped galvanize the collective identity of the people of Quebec. Some of his most popular songs included “Notre sentier,” “Moi, mes souliers,” “Bozo” and “Le Tour de l’Ȋle.” He received three Grand Prix du disque from the Académie Charles-Cros in Paris, as well as the Prix de musique Calixa-Lavallée, the Prix Denise-Pelletier and the Diplôme d'honneur. He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Grand Officer of the National Order of Québec and a Chevalier of France's Légion d'honneur.

Article

Samantha Bee

Samantha Bee, comedian, actor, writer, producer (born 25 October 1969 in TorontoON). A whip smart and scrappy comedian with an acerbic and aggressive edge, Samantha Bee is perhaps best known as the longest-serving correspondent (2003–15) on the satirical comedy news program The Daily Show. A winner of three Canadian Comedy Awards, she has also acted in numerous films and television series. Her own late-night comedy series, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, debuted in February 2016.

Editorial

A Place to Happen

It has been said that Canadians don’t tell our own stories or celebrate our own myths. Our history is full of epics considered “too small to be tragic,” as The Tragically Hip’s Gord Downie once sang.

Article

Florence Bird

Florence Bayard Bird (née Rhein, pseudonym Anne Francis), CC, senator, journalist, broadcaster and author (born 15 January 1908 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; died 18 July 1998 in Ottawa, Ontario). Chair of the Royal Commission on the Status of Women in Canada from 1967 to 1970, Florence Bird made her name as a broadcast journalist for CBC/Radio-Canada, reporting news and producing documentaries on women’s working conditions and on conditions for women in Canada’s prisons.

Article

Keanu Reeves

Keanu Charles Reeves, actor, producer, director, musician (born 2 September 1964 in Beirut, Lebanon). Keanu Reeves is one of the most recognizable film actors in the world. After early work in Toronto with the CBC and the NFB, he moved to Los Angeles and made a meteoric rise to stardom in such films as Dangerous Liaisons (1988), Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989), Point Break (1991) and My Own Private Idaho (1991). He is perhaps best known for action-adventure movies such as Speed (1994), the John Wick franchise and The Matrix trilogy.

Macleans

Jack Shadbolt (Obituary)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 7, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

A few days before Jack Shadbolt came home from the hospital on Nov. 16, his wife, Doris, and some friends set up a bedroom in the centre of the artist’s studio, an enormous, skylit room attached to the Shadbolts’ mountainside house in Burnaby, B.C.

Macleans

Evelyn Hart (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 27, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Even in rehearsal, even going through the paces with a stand-in partner who has not danced in years, even with all the stops and starts, Evelyn Hart displays some of the ethereal grace that is her signature as a dancer.

Macleans

Mary Walsh (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on February 26, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

It is a slow news week. While politicians bicker over the divisibility of Quebec, the big story is the weather, a cold snap that has the country frozen in a grimace of national unity from sea to shivering sea.

Macleans

Vicki Gabereau (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 29, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

She looks . . . well, not precisely girlish. But still, there is something undeniably youthful about the woman at the corner table of the nearly deserted bar in Vancouver's Hyatt Regency Hotel.

Macleans

Garth Hudson (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on July 22, 2002. Partner content is not updated.

It's close to dawn when Garth Hudson shows me the gun. "I made it from a kit," he says, fondling a derringer with a smooth wooden handle. Hudson is sitting at a piano in his home studio, an old cabin in New York's Catskill Mountains.

Macleans

Moses Znaimer (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 8, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

"Far-fetched nonsense," scoffed The Globe and Mail’s John Doyle, while The Toronto Star’s Greg Quill dismissed him as "an outrageous pompous bore, a self-promoting Big Brother talking down to us all.

Macleans

Mike Bullard (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 28, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Outside John Brunton's office in the old Masonic Temple, workers are ripping out the guts of the historic downtown Toronto edifice, putting in lights and drop ceilings, toilets and showers and walls, transforming the storied concert venue into a state-of-the-art TV studio.

Macleans

Newman Loses Co-hosting Job

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on January 18, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

As the clock wound down on a Good Morning America broadcast last week, co-host Kevin Newman was promoting highlights for the ABC network show the next day. One was an interview with a former host of the program who now anchors occasional specials for ABC.

Macleans

Marion Woodman (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 13, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

In the 17 years since she began popularizing the dream theories of Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, Woodman has become one of the biggest names in the continent's human potential circles.

Macleans

Crash Test Dummies (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 27, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

It’s Tuesday night at MuchMusic’s downtown Toronto headquarters and the star-maker machinery is working overtime. A crew is busy taping a live Intimate and Interactive special on the latest Canadian pop sensation, Crash Test Dummies.

//