Search for "New France"

Displaying 341-360 of 3298 results
Article

Walter Allward

Walter Seymour Allward, sculptor (born 18 November 1876 in Toronto; died 24 April 1955 in Toronto). Walter Allward cemented his reputation as one of Canada’s greatest monumental sculptors with the mammoth Canadian National Vimy Memorial in Vimy, France (1922–36), which commemorated the important Battle of Vimy Ridge (April 1917) and the more than 11,000 Canadians listed as missing in action during the First World War.

Article

Hubert Loiselle

Hubert Loiselle, actor (b at Montréal 17 Feb 1932; d there 16 Nov 2004). On Québec stages and screens for more than forty years, this likeable actor left his mark on several roles, particularly supporting ones, for his good nature, charm, and sensitivity.

Article

Feist

Leslie Feist, singer, songwriter, musician (b at Amherst, NS 13 Feb 1976). Feist spent her teen years in Calgary and became lead vocalist for a local punk band called Placebo when she was 15.

Article

Sally Clark

In 1983 she directed Ten Ways to Abuse an Old Woman, her first one-act play, at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre's Rhubarb Festival. Her breakthrough came in 1984 when Clarke Rogers directed her first full-length play, Lost Souls and Missing Persons, at Theatre Passe Muraille in Toronto.

Article

Herbert L. Clarke

Herbert L. (Lincoln) Clarke. Cornetist, bandmaster, violinist, violist, composer, b Woburn, Mass, 12 Sep 1867, d Long Beach, Cal, 30 Jan 1945. His father, William Horatio Clarke (1840-1913), was appointed organist-choirmaster at Jarvis St Baptist Church, Toronto, in 1880.

Article

Michael Miller

Miller, Michael (Richard). Composer, pianist, b Lisbon 24 Jul 1932, naturalized Canadian 1972; BA (New York University) 1955, MA (ESM) 1956, PH D (ESM) 1971. He studied composition at the ESM with Bernard Rogers and Wayne Barlow. He taught at New York University 1961-5 and Vassar College 1965-6.

Article

Les Disciples de Massenet

Les Disciples de Massenet. A 65-voice mixed choir founded in Montreal 4 Feb 1928 by Charles Goulet. He named it after the composer of La Navarraise, the opera in which he had made his 1923 debut as a baritone at the Théâtre royal, Liège.

Article

Édith Tremblay

(Marie) Édith (Louise Ginette) Tremblay. Soprano, b Arvida (renamed Jonquière), Que, 11 Apr 1947; deuxième prix voice (CMQ) 1971.

Article

Geneviéve Cadieux

Cadieux has represented Canada in 3 major international biennials: Venice (1990), where she devised a seminal installation at the Canadian Pavilion, Sydney (1988, 1990), and Sao Paulo (1987).

Article

Ian Hugh Wallace

Ian Hugh Wallace, artist (born at Shoreham, England 25 Aug 1943). He moved to Canada in 1944 and is an influential Vancouver artist and teacher known for his conceptual art, painting, photographic murals and critical writings.

Article

Marcel Barbeau

Marcel Barbeau, painter, sculptor, filmmaker (born 18 February 1925 in Montréal, QC; died 2 January 2016 in Montréal). One of the original signatories of Refus global, Barbeau was an active member of the Automotistes led by Paul-Émile Borduas.

Article

John Burke

John (Joseph) Burke. Composer, teacher, b Toronto 10 May 1951; B MUS (McGill) 1974, M MUS (Michigan) 1976, DMA (Michigan) 1983.

Article

Paula Ross

Paula Ross (stage name), choreographer and dancer; born Pauline Cecilia Isobel Teresa Campbell (Vancouver 29 Apr 1941).

Article

Félix Leclerc

Félix Eugène Leclerc, OC, GOQ, singer-songwriter, poet, novelist, playwright, actor, broadcaster (born 2 August 1914 at La Tuque, QC; died 8 August 1988 at Ȋle d'Orléans, QC). Félix Leclerc was a revolutionary artist whose work in several fields marked a turning point in Quebec culture. As a poet and playwright, he was one of Quebec’s literary giants. As a singer, he was a superstar in Canada and Europe, particularly in France. He greatly influenced the course of the Québec chanson and paved the way for the popular chansonnier movement in Quebec and France. He was a vocal proponent of Quebec nationalism and helped galvanize the collective identity of the people of Quebec. Some of his most popular songs included “Notre sentier,” “Moi, mes souliers,” “Bozo” and “Le Tour de l’Ȋle.” He received three Grand Prix du disque from the Académie Charles-Cros in Paris, as well as the Prix de musique Calixa-Lavallée, the Prix Denise-Pelletier and the Diplôme d'honneur. He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Grand Officer of the National Order of Québec and a Chevalier of France's Légion d'honneur.

Article

Léon Bellefleur

Léon Bellefleur, painter, engraver (b at Montréal 8 Feb 1910; d there 22 Feb 2007). After receiving a teaching diploma in 1929, Léon Bellefleur took evening classes at the École des beaux-arts de Montréal until 1938 and in 1940 met Alfred PELLAN.

Article

Jean Le Buis

Jean Le Buis. Organist, teacher, composer, b Verdun (Montreal) 30 Nov 1956; premier prix analysis (CMM) 1980, premier prix organ (CMM) 1981, premier prix organ (Rueil-Malmaison Cons) 1983.

Article

Paul-André Fortier

In 1987 he and Daniel Jackson launched a repertory company, MONTRÉAL DANSE, where Fortier choreographed and co-directed until 1989, when he accepted a faculty position teaching choreography at the Université du Québec à Montréal.