Search for "black history"

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Richard Outram

Richard Outram, poet (born at Port Hope, Ont 9 April 1930; died there 21 January 2005). Richard Outram is often cited as an essential contributor to Canadian POETRY from the second half of the 20th century.

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Anne Michaels

​Anne Michaels, poet, novelist (born 15 April 1958 in Toronto, ON). Winner of the Commonwealth Prize as well as the Trillium Book Award and the Orange Prize for Fiction.

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Beau Dommage

Beau Dommage was a Quebec folk-rock group that was formed around 1972 and became known for its distinctive urban poetry and songs about adolescence and daily life in Montreal. The group’s second album, Où est passée la noce?, came out in 1975 and was one of the first in the history of music in Canada to go platinum according to the Canadian Recording Industry Association (100,000 copies sold). Beau Dommage was inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2017.

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Lee Maracle

Lee Maracle, OC, author and critic (born 2 July 1950 in Vancouver, BC; died 11 November 2021 in Surrey, BC). Lee Maracle was a prolific First Nations writer and expert on First Nations culture and history, and an influential Indigenous voice in Canadian postcolonial criticism.

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Oscar Peterson

Oscar Emmanuel Peterson, CC, CQ, OOnt, jazz pianist, composer, educator (born 15 August 1925 in Montréal, QC; died 23 December 2007 in Mississauga, ON). Oscar Peterson is one of Canada’s most honoured musicians. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time. He was renowned for his remarkable speed and dexterity, meticulous and ornate technique, and dazzling, swinging style. He earned the nicknames “the brown bomber of boogie-woogie” and “master of swing.” A prolific recording artist, he typically released several albums a year from the 1950s until his death. He also appeared on more than 200 albums by other artists, including Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong, who called him “the man with four hands.” His sensitivity in these supporting roles, as well as his acclaimed compositions such as Canadiana Suite and “Hymn to Freedom,” was overshadowed by his stunning virtuosity as a soloist. Also a noted jazz educator and advocate for racial equality, Peterson won a Juno Award and eight Grammy Awards, including one for lifetime achievement. The first recipient of the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement, he was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the International Jazz Hall of Fame. He was also made an Officer and then Companion of the Order of Canada, and an Officer in the Order of Arts and Letters in France, among many other honours.

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William Ford Gibson (Profile)

Gibson has become adept at viewing the world from a mind-warping distance. In essence, that is what he does in his writing. The 47-year-old author, who was raised in Virginia but has lived in Canada since 1969, has reinvented the landscape of science fiction.

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Edward Burtynsky

Burtynsky began taking photographs at an early age. When he was 11, his father, a Ukrainian immigrant who worked on the production line at the local General Motors plant, purchased a darkroom and cameras from a widow whose husband had been an amateur photographer.

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David Milne

Along with American painter Marsden Hartley, David Milne was on the leading of edge of artists bringing European modernism to North America.

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Vicki Gabereau (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 29, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

She looks . . . well, not precisely girlish. But still, there is something undeniably youthful about the woman at the corner table of the nearly deserted bar in Vancouver's Hyatt Regency Hotel.

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Millennials in Canada

The millennial generation (also known as Generation Y) refers to a cohort of people born roughly between 1980 and 1996, though some have a more restrictive definition (see Population of Canada). Most millennials are children of members of the baby boom generation, a term which refers to those born immediately following the end of the Second World War. Millennials are often compared to and defined by the ways in which they are both a product of, and a challenge to, their parents’s generational traits.

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Paul Woodford

Paul (Gerard) Woodford. Historian, teacher, conductor, b St John's, Nfld, 6 Apr 1955; B MUS music education (Toronto) 1977, B ED (Toronto) 1978, M MUS music education (Western) 1983.

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Rivka Golani

Rivka Golani has made major contributions to the advancement of viola technique, and has been a source of inspiration to other players and to composers who have been motivated to write specifically for the instrument. More than 200 works have been written for Golani, including 30 concertos.

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Maryvonne Kendergi

Maryvonne Kendergi, Armenian pianist, broadcaster, teacher, musicologist, administrator (b at Aïntab (now Gaziantep) Turkey 15 Aug 1915, naturalized Canadian 1960, d Montreal, 27 Sep 2011).

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Alan Lessem

Alan (Philip) Lessem. Musicologist, teacher, administrator, b Salisbury, Rhodesia (Harare, Zimbabwe), 29 Nov 1940, naturalized Canadian 1981, d Toronto 5 Oct 1991; BA (Cape Town) 1963, B MUS (Cape Town) 1963, M LITT (Cambridge) 1967, PH D (Illinois) 1973.

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Camille Laurin

Camille Laurin, politician and psychiatrist (born 6 May 1922 in Charlemagne, QC; died 11 March 1999 in Vaudreuil-Dorion, QC).

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Franz Boas

Franz Boas, anthropologist, ethnologist, folklorist, linguist (born 9 July 1858 in Minden, Westphalia, Germany; died on 21 December 1942 in New York City, NY).

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Michael Crummey

Michael Crummey, poet, short story writer, novelist (born at Buchans, NL 18 November 1965). Following a childhood in Buchans, Nfld, and Wabush, Labrador, Michael Crummey graduated from MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF NEWFOUNDLAND in 1987 with a BA in English.

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Linda Bouchard

In 1990 Linda Bouchard returned to Canada, where she composed music for commissions from the New Music America Festival and for the opening of the Musée d'Art Contemporain de Montréal.

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Tattannoeuck (Augustus)

Tattannoeuck (Inuktitut for “it is full” or “the belly,” also known as Augustus), Inuit hunter, interpreter (born in the late 1700s, north of Churchill, MB; died in late February or early March 1834 near Fort Resolution, NT).