Search for "black history"

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Article

Jessie Oonark

Jessie Oonark, "Una," OC, artist (born 1906 in the Back River area, NWT [now Nunavut]; died 2 March 1985 in Churchill, MB).

Article

Paul Brandt

Paul Brandt, singer. Songwriter, b Paul Rennee Belobersycky, Calgary 21 July 1972. Brandt grew up on gospel music and sang in church, but he soon developed a love for country music and, in 1992, won $1000 in a talent contest at the Calgary Stampede.

Article

Paul Brandt

Paul Brandt, singer, songwriter (b at Calgary 21 July 1972). Paul Brandt grew up on gospel music and sang in church, but he soon developed a love for country music and, in 1992, won $1 000 in a talent contest at the Calgary Stampede.

Macleans

Marion Woodman (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 13, 1996. Partner content is not updated.

In the 17 years since she began popularizing the dream theories of Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung, Woodman has become one of the biggest names in the continent's human potential circles.

Article

The Halluci Nation (A Tribe Called Red)

Electronic group The Halluci Nation (previously known as A Tribe Called Red) has garnered international acclaim for its politically charged, powwow drum-driven dance music. Featuring the DJs Bear Witness (Thomas Ehren Ramon) and 2oolman (Tim Hill), the group emerged from an Ottawa club party called Electric Pow Wow, which began in 2007. Former members include DJ Shub (Dan General), and founding members DJ NDN (Ian Campeau) and Dee Jay Frame (Jon Limoges). The group has described its “powwow step” music as “the soundtrack to a contemporary evolution of the powwow.” ATCR is part of what broadcaster and educator Wab Kinew has called the “Indigenous Music Renaissance,” an innovative new generation of Indigenous artists in Canada. The group was nominated for the Polaris Music Prize in 2013 and 2017, and has won three Juno Awards, including Breakthrough Group of the Year in 2014 and Group of the Year in 2018.

Article

George B. Sippi

George B. (Buckley) Sippi. Organist, choirmaster, teacher, b Bombay 10 Mar 1847, d London, Ont, 18 Sep 1915. His family returned in 1854 to Ireland from India, where his Italian grandfather had settled. He attended Queen's College in Cork and studied piano and organ with his uncle, John A.

Article

Nancy Vogan

Nancy (Fraser) Vogan. Educator. b Moncton, NB, 22 Mar 1945; BA music (Mount Allison) 1967, M MUS music education (ESM) 1969, PH D music education (ESM) 1979.

Article

Thomas Head Raddall

Thomas Head Raddall, historical novelist (b at Hythe, Eng 13 Nov 1903; d at Liverpool, NS 1 Apr 1994). Raddall was brought as a boy to Nova Scotia, the province about which he was to write in a score of books, fictional and nonfictional.

Article

Benoît Verdickt

Benoît Verdickt. Organist, choirmaster, composer, educator, b Steenhuffel, Belgium, 27 Sep 1884, d Ville St-Laurent, Montreal, 28 Apr 1970. A graduate of the Mechlin Cons, he also studied at the Interdiocesan School of Sacred Music in that city.

Article

Stephen Leacock

Stephen Butler Leacock, FRSC, humorist, author, academic (born 30 December 1869 in Swanmore, England; died 28 March 1944 in Toronto, ON). Stephen Leacock was the English-speaking world’s best-known humorist between 1915 and 1925. He was awarded the Mark Twain Medal for humour, the Royal Society of Canada’s Lorne Pierce Medal and the Governor General’s Literary Award for non-fiction. Trained as an economist, historian and political scientist, he served as a professor in the Department of Economics and Political Science at McGill University from 1903 to 1936. The Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour was established in his honour in 1947. He was designated a National Historic Person of Canada in 1968.

Macleans

Maud Lewis

Maud Lewis, artist (born 7 March 1903 in South Ohio, Nova Scotia; died 30 July 1970 in Digby, Nova Scotia).

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Corrine Hunt

Corrine Hunt, artist (born in 1959 in Alert Bay, British Columbia). She is a member of the Raven Gwa’wina clan from Ts’akis, a Komoyue village on Vancouver Island.

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Jean-Pierre Pinson

Jean-Pierre Pinson. Musicologist, teacher, flutist, b Orléans, France, 12 Dec 1943; L LITT (Poitiers) 1967; Certificate in musicology (Poitiers) 1977, MA musicology (Montreal) 1977, PH D musicology (Montreal) 1981.

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David Rabinowitch

David Rabinowitch, sculptor (b at Toronto 6 Mar 1943). Like his twin brother Royden RABINOWITCH, he first came to national attention as a member of the artistic community in London, Ontario, around Greg CURNOE, celebrated in the National Gallery of Canada's exhibition, The Heart of London (1968).

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Ronald Sanders

Ronald Sanders, picture editor (born at Winnipeg). Ronald Sanders was exposed to film at an early age since his father worked as a projectionist. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts from St. John's College, University of Manitoba, he moved to Toronto.

Article

Linda Hutcheon

Linda Hutcheon, literary and art critic, educator (born at Toronto, Ont 24 Aug 1947). Educated at the University of Toronto and Cornell University, she is currently professor of English and comparative literature at U of T.

Article

Gaston Ouellet

Gaston (Marcel) Ouellet. Harpsichord maker, teacher, musicologist, born Dolbeau, Lac-St-Jean, Que, 24 Jan 1930, died Pointe-Claire, Que, 2 Sep 2011; B MUS (Montreal) 1967, L MUS (Montreal) 1968, MA (Wayne State, Detroit) 1968, D MUS (Montreal) 1974.