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Displaying 3181-3200 of 3297 results
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Gary Kulesha

Kulesha, Gary. Composer, conductor, b Toronto 22 Aug 1954; ARCT piano (1973), LTCL theory (1976), ARCT composition (1978), FTCL composition (1978). Kulesha was a pupil of William G.

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Eden Smith

The son of a builder, while pursuing art and architectural studies in Birmingham, Smith became familiar with Arts and Crafts ideals by association with the William Morris circle.

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Paul Gross

The elder son of an army colonel, Paul Gross appeared in his first TV commercial at the age of 14.

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Robert Markle

Robert Markle, painter, writer, musician, educator (born 1936 in Hamilton, ON; died 1990 in Mount Forest, ON). Markle was Mohawk, but his relationship to his ancestry was not straightforward. It was only later in life that Markle actively incorporated aspects of his Indigenous identity into his art. Most well known for his female nudes, Markle usually depicted his wife, Marlene, or burlesque dancers. Following a Toronto police raid of a gallery exhibiting his work in 1965, some of Markle’s drawings were identified as obscene by a judge. Markle remains known for his sensual and passionate artwork.

Macleans

Betty Goodwin (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 30, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Betty Goodwin draws on the skin of things. She makes art with flattened shrouds of disembodied clothes, old vests pressed into paper like dried flowers. She stitches scars onto a black tarpaulin that hangs folded, with ropes dangling, like a stage curtain.

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Derek Healey

Derek (Edward) Healey. Composer, organist, teacher, b Wargrave, England, 2 May 1936; B MUS (Durham) 1961, D MUS (Toronto) 1974. Derek Healey studied at the Royal College of Music 1952-6 with Herbert Howells (composition) and Harold Darke (organ).

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Sarah Fischer

After a leave-taking recital, Fischer left for London to complete her training at the RCM 1919-22 with Cecilia M. Hutchinson.

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Scott Speedman

​Robert Scott Speedman, actor (born 1 September 1975 in London, England). Scott Speedman’s laid back, boyish charm, teen idol looks and natural athleticism have led to a diverse career in action films, indie dramas, horror movies and romantic comedies.

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Juliette Huot

Juliette Huot, actress (born 9 January 1912 in Montreal, QC; died 16 March 2001 in Brossard, QC). Huot was a pioneer in Québec radio, theatre and television.

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Stories We Tell

Stories We Tell sees Sarah Polley invite her family and friends to share a family secret. This intimate and genre-bending film mixes interviews and home movies as Polley explores the greater truths that lie between conflicting narratives. The film received numerous awards and accolades, including Best Feature Length Documentary at the Canadian Screen Awards. It was named one of the Top 10 Canadian films of all time in a poll conducted by the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in 2015, and one of 150 essential works in Canadian cinema history in a similar poll in 2016.

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Barbara Paterson

Barbara A. Paterson, CM, sculptor (born in Edmonton, AB). Barbara Paterson is a sculptor who works with wax, stone, bronze and steel. Her works often depict women and historical figures. She is perhaps best known for Women are Persons!, a bronze monument to the Persons Case that depicts the Famous Five. There are two copies of the monument, one located on Parliament Hill and the other in Calgary’s Olympic Plaza. Paterson was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2021.

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Norval Morrisseau and the Art of Forgery

In the early 2000s, Ojibwe artist Norval Morrisseau identified several forgeries being sold as genuine Morrisseau pieces. Since his death, a well-known case in 2018 involving keyboardist Kevin Hearn of the Barenaked Ladies exposed an art-fraud ring in Thunder Bay. The same year, the documentary There Are No Fakes, directed by Jamie Kastner, helped to bring this issue concerning Morrisseau forgeries into the public view. Instances of fake and forged art have impacted Indigenous artists on a devastating scale. (See also Contemporary Indigenous Art in Canada.)

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Wilton Littlechild

Jacob Wilton (Willie) Littlechild, CM, athlete, lawyer, Cree chief, politician, advocate for Indigenous rights (born 1 April 1944 in Hobbema, [now Maskwacîs] AB). Littlechild formed and coached Alberta’s first all-Indigenous junior hockey team and created the National Indian Athletic Association. He is a member of seven sports halls of fame. In 1976, Littlechild earned a law degree from the University of Alberta. He went on to become the first member of Parliament with Treaty Indian Status in Canada in 1988. Littlechild served as a commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2009. Throughout his career, Littlechild has promoted Indigenous rights both nationally and internationally.

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Angela Sidney (Stóow Ch’óonehte’ Máa)

Angela Sidney (née Johns), (Stóow Ch’óonehte’ Máa), CM, Elder, storyteller, author (born 4 January 1902 near Carcross, YT; died 17 July 1991 in Whitehorse, YT). Of Tagish and Tlingit descent, Sidney was one of the last fluent speakers of the Tagish language. A storyteller, Sidney recorded and preserved the stories, traditions, languages, place names and genealogies of her people. She was the first Indigenous woman from Yukon to be appointed to the Order of Canada.

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Oskar Morawetz

Oskar Morawetz developed at an early age an ability to sight-read orchestral scores at the piano, and at 19 was recommended by George Szell for the assistant conductor's post with the Prague Opera, a post he turned down.

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Godfrey Ridout

Ridout began teaching at the TCM in 1940 and at the University of Toronto in 1948; he retired from the latter in 1982as professor emeritus.

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Zacharias Kunuk

Zacharias Kunuk, OC, filmmaker, carver, sculptor, visual artist (born 27 November 1957 in Kapuivik, Nunavut). An internationally acclaimed media maker, Zacharias Kunuk has played a crucial role in the redefinition of ethnographic filmmaking in Canada and has been at the forefront of the Inuit’s innovative use of broadcast technology. He is perhaps best known for his debut feature film, Atanarjuat (The Fast Runner), which won six Genie Awards (including Best Screenplay, Best Direction and Best Motion Picture) and was ranked the No. 1 Canadian film of all time in a 2015 poll conducted by the Toronto International Film Festival.

Macleans

Guido Nincheri (Profile)

Whether the subject is the nativity scene or Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, Nincheri's works are evocative portrayals of well-known biblical stories. Although he received his art education in Italy, his talents flourished in Canada, where he arrived in 1914.