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Mariatu Kamara

Mariatu Kamara, author, UNICEF Canada’s Special Representative for Children in Armed Conflict, humanitarian and activist (born 25 May 1986 in Yonkro, Sierra Leone). Mariatu Kamara, a survivor of the civil war in Sierra Leone, immigrated to Canada in 2002. Since moving to Canada, she has worked with Free The Children and UNICEF Canada to promote the rights of women and children and highlight the impact of war on children. Her memoir, The Bite of the Mango (2008), has won several awards. Founder of the Mariatu Foundation, Kamara was named a Voices of Courage Honoree by the Women’s Refugee Commission in 2009.

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Yann Martel

Best known for his award-winning The Life of Pi, Yann Martel has continued his meditations on memory, horror and the consequences of human error and human evil.

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Donnacona

Donnacona, St Lawrence Iroquoian leader (d in France probably in 1539), headman of the village of Stadacona [near Québec City] during Jacques Cartier's voyages of 1534-36, protested when Cartier raised his cross in Gaspé in July 1534.

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Francis Lukeman

Francis Lawrence Lukeman, (born at Montréal 20 Jun 1885; died at Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC 23 Dec 1946). Nicknamed the "Flying Canuck" thanks to the great speed that he exhibited in athletic competitions, he took part in the OLYMPIC GAMES in London (1908) and Stockholm (1912) in TRACK AND FIELD.

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George Vernot

George Vernot, (born at Montréal 27 Feb 1901; died there 22 Nov 1962). George Vernot was a swimmer and WATER POLO player who participated in the SUMMER OLYMPICS in SPEED SWIMMING in Antwerp (1920), and in Paris (1924).

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Johanna Skibsrud

A second collection of poems, I do not Think that I Could Love a Human Being, appeared in 2010. In many ways it reflects the preoccupations of the first; seemingly everyday events can form turning points in outlook or sensibility.

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Mowachaht-Muchalaht

The Mowachaht and Muchalaht are Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations which formally amalgamated in the 1950s. Together, their territory includes parts of the west coast of Vancouver Island. As of September 2018, the federal government reports the registered population to be 613. Along with other Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council nations, the Mowachaht-Muchalaht are currently in stage four of a six-stage treaty process in British Columbia to attain self-government.

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Nahani

Nahani (also Nahanni, Nahane) is an Athapaskan word that has been used to designate Aboriginal groups in BC, the NWT and the YT. Nahani is an inaccurate and inappropriate name for any specific group or for any cultural-linguistic grouping.

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Indigenous-French Relations

French fishermen, settlers, fur traders, missionaries and colonial agents were among the earliest Europeans to have sustained contact with ​Indigenous peoples in what is now Canada and North America. The relationship between French and Indigenous people of the Eastern Woodlands in the early colonial period was complex and interdependent. France saw Indigenous nations as allies, and relied on them for survival and fur trade wealth. Indigenous people traded for European goods, established military alliances and hostilities, intermarried, sometimes converted to Christianity, and participated politically in the governance of New France. With the transfer of New France to Britain in 1763, diplomatic relations between the French and Indigenous people in Canada ceased. Naturally, social and economic interaction between the European and Indigenous inhabitants of New France continued.

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John Meredith

John Meredith, painter (b at Fergus, Ont 24 July 1933; d at Toronto, Ont 9 Sept 2000), brother of William RONALD. John Meredith Smith (known professionally since 1951 as John Meredith), studied at the Ontario College of Art 1950-53, and had his first solo exhibition in 1958.

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Palaeoindian

Some discoveries at the BLUEFISH CAVES and the OLD CROW BASIN in the Yukon trace back the occupation of these two deposits at around 25 000 to 40 000 years BP, based on dates obtained from sediments and mammoth bones that have most likely been modified by humans.

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Bronfman Family

Descendants of Russian immigrant tobacco farmer Yechiel (Ekiel) Bronfman and his wife, Mindel, members of the Bronfman family have owned and controlled huge financial empires built from the profits of the family liquor business (see Seagram). The best-known members of the family are Samuel Bronfman, founder of Seagram and president of the Canadian Jewish Congress (1939–62), and his descendants. Samuel’s wife, Saidye Rosner Bronfman, was an influential philanthropist who supported the arts in Canada and was awarded the Order of the British Empire for organizing work on the home front during the Second World War. Sons Edgar and Charles Bronfman ran Seagram for decades, while grandson Edgar Miles Bronfman Jr. oversaw the sale of Seagram to Vivendi. Charles was also co-founder of the Historica Foundation of Canada and Heritage Minutes, as well as chairman and principal owner of the Montreal Expos. His sister Phyllis Lambert is a well-known architect who founded the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Their cousins, Edward and Peter Bronfman (sons of Allan Bronfman), developed a financial empire in their own right. The family has given generously to several charitable organizations and been involved in the Canadian Jewish Congress and World Jewish Congress. 

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Charles Bronfman

Charles Rosner Bronfman, PC, CC, businessman and philanthropist (born 27 June 1931 in Montréal, QC). Bronfman was co-chairman of the Bronfman family business, Seagram, the world’s largest producer and distributor of distilled spirits. He also owned the Montreal Expos baseball club from 1968 to 1990. According to Forbes, Bronfman had an estimated net worth of over $2 billion (as of 2017) and was ranked the 16th wealthiest Canadian and 896th wealthiest person in the world. Bronfman is also a dedicated philanthropist. He established the CRB Foundation to promote study of Canadian and Jewish affairs, and co-founded and endowed the Historica Foundation of Canada, which later became Historica Canada (publisher of The Canadian Encyclopedia). He has disbursed approximately $325 million through Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies Inc. (ACBP) and private donations.

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Victor Lauriston

Victor Lauriston, journalist, historian, author (born at Fletcher, Ont, 16 Oct 1881; died at Chatham, Ont, Oct 1973). Born William Edward Park in the small community of Fletcher, Ont, Victor Lauriston adopted his pen name when he began writing, as he considered his birth name too plain.

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Rita Wong

Rita Wong, poet, educator (born at Calgary, Alta 1968). Rita Wong grew up in Calgary. In 1990 she graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY with a BA.

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Netsilingmiut

Until the latter half of the 20th century, the Netsilingmiut were nomadic hunters who lived in small shifting family groups with simple nonhierarchical social organization. They had no formal government and no institutionalized group relationships.