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Peter Mansbridge

Peter Mansbridge, OC, television news anchor, journalist, columnist (born 6 July 1948 in London, England). A widely respected journalist, Peter Mansbridge was the face of CBC News for nearly 30 years. As the chief correspondent and lead anchor of The National from 1988 to 2017, he won 12 Gemini Awards for broadcast excellence, including the Gordon Sinclair Award for best overall broadcast journalist in 1990 and 1998. His other honours include two Canadian Screen Awards as well as numerous honorary degrees and lifetime achievement awards. He has been inducted into the Canadian News Hall of Fame and is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

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Douglas Lloyd Campbell

Douglas Lloyd Campbell, politician, premier of Manitoba 1948-58 (b at Portage la Prairie, Man 27 May 1895). D.L. Campbell won election to the Manitoba legislature in 1922 as a Farmers' candidate in Lakeside riding, which he represented for 47 years.

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Nicole Brossard

Nicole Brossard, writer, publisher (b at Montréal 27 Nov 1943). Brossard is a leading exponent of so-called formalist poetry in Québec and a major theoretician and promoter of literary and cultural feminism.

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Brothers of the Christian Schools

The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools is a Catholic religious order founded by Jean-Baptiste de La Salle in France in 1680. In Canada, members are generally referred to as Christian Brothers or De La Salle Brothers. They are not to be confused with the Congregation of Christian Brothers who were founded by Edmund Rice in Ireland in 1802 and whose members in Canada were also called Christian Brothers or Irish Christian Brothers. The Brothers of the Christian Schools were a major force in Catholic education in Canada, especially in Quebec. They first arrived in Montreal in 1837, then experienced numeric growth, geographic expansion and a solid reputation over the next 125 years. The Brothers underwent a significant exodus and decline in vocations with the dramatic religious and social changes spawned by the Second Vatican Council and the Quiet Revolution.

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George Brown

George Brown, journalist, politician (born 29 November 1818 in Alloa, Scotland; died 9 May 1880 in Toronto, ON).

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Bing Thom

Bing Wing Thom, CM, architect (born 8 December 1940 in Hong Kong; died 4 October 2016 in Hong Kong). A Member of the Order of Canada and a winner of the Governor General’s Award, Bing Thom’s strong design values and holistic approach in practice made him one of Canada’s top architects.

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William Brymner

In 1886 he was appointed director of art classes at the Art Association of Montreal. The same year he became a full RCA member. He painted the human figure and interiors in a representational style; he also did watercolours on silk, and murals, as found in the old Porteous house on Île d'Orléans.

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Ernest Buckler

He began his writing career by contributing short stories and essays to Esquire and Saturday Night. His major achievement, however, The Mountain and the Valley (1952), is a novel about a gifted, ambitious boy who remains so deeply attached to life in rural NS that his creativity becomes stifled.

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Arthur Buies

Arthur Buies, baptized Joseph-Marie-Arthur, journalist, chronicler, essayist (b at Montréal 24 Jan 1840; d at Québec City 29 Jan 1901). A lucid witness to and passionate participant in the late 19th-century ideological battles, Buies left behind a body of exceptional works which are not well known.

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Erskine Henry Bronson

Erskine Henry Bronson, manufacturer, politician (b at Bolton, NY 12 Sept 1844; d at Ottawa 19 Oct 1920). His father, Henry Franklin BRONSON, moved the family to Bytown [Ottawa] in 1853 during an influx of Americans attracted by cheap waterpower at the Chaudière Falls.

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Gordon Pinsent

Newfoundland settings and characters are important in Gordon Pinsent's writings. Responsible for many of his own best roles, Pinsent wrote the screenplay and the musical version of The Rowdyman (film released in 1972), playing the charming and irresponsible character in both.

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Allan Brooks

Drawings and paintings of birds, some of which survive from his fifth year, form his greatest legacy; he was illustrator of A.P. Taverner's books on Canadian birds and of several American ornithological and popular works.

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George Browne Jr

George Browne Jr, architect (b at Montréal, Canada East 1852 or 1853; d at South Nyack, NY 12 Mar 1919). After study with his father, a prominent Montréal architect, Browne travelled in Europe and went to South Kensington School of Art, London.

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Étienne Brûlé

Étienne Brûlé, explorer, interpreter (b probably at Champigny-sur-Marne, France c 1592; d in Huronia c June 1633). Brûlé was the first Frenchman to live among the Indigenous people.

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Peter Henderson Bryce

Peter Henderson Bryce, physician, public health official (born 17 August 1853 in Mount Pleasant, Canada West; died 15 January 1932 at sea). Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce was a pioneer of public health and sanitation policy in Canada. He is most remembered for his efforts to improve the health and living conditions of Indigenous people. His Report on the Indian Schools of Manitoba and the Northwest Territories exposed the unsanitary conditions of residential schools in the Prairie provinces. It also prompted national calls for residential school reform.

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Ross Rebagliati

Ross Rebagliati, snowboarder, businessman (born 14 July 1971 in Vancouver, BC). Rebagliati won the first ever Olympic gold medal in snowboarding at the 1998 Olympic Winter Games in Nagano. However, soon after his victory, the International Olympic Committee announced that he had tested positive for marijuana and would be stripped of his medal. Within a week, the decision had been overturned by the Court of Arbitration in Sport and his medal reinstated. In 2013, Rebagliati founded Ross’ Gold, a medical marijuana business. The company promotes the medical and recreational use of marijuana for athletes.

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