Search for "New France"

Displaying 241-260 of 5377 results
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French Canadian Nationalism

French Canadian nationalism concerns a wide variety of manifestations of the collective will of much of Canada's French-speaking population to live as a distinct cultural community. Its innumerable ramifications have been not only cultural but also political, economic and social.

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Obwandiyag (Pontiac)

Obwandiyag (Pontiac), Odawa chief (born c. 1720 along the Detroit River; died 20 April 1769 in Cahokia, Illinois Country). Obwandiyag was the leader of a loose coalition of Indigenous nations that opposed British rule in what became known as Pontiac’s War (1763–66). The uprising is regarded by many as a historical antecedent to more contemporary Indigenous rights movements.

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Swiss Canadians

Swiss immigration to the territory we now know as Canada began in the late 16th century. The 2016 census reported 155, 120 people of Swiss origin in Canada (25, 235 single responses and 129, 885 multiple responses).

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Josèphe Colle

Josèphe Colle. Soprano, teacher, b Nancy, France, 24 Aug 1929, naturalized Canadian 1958; BA, psychology (Montreal) 1955; premier prix, analysis and musical aesthetics (Cons national, Paris) 1956.

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Isaac de Razilly

Isaac de Razilly, naval captain, knight of Malta, colonizer and lieutenant-general in Acadia (b at Château d'Oiseaumelle, Touraine, France 1587; d at La Hève, Acadia 1636).

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Lynnwood Farnam

(Walter) Lynnwood Farnam. Organist, teacher, b Sutton, southeast of Montreal, 13 Jan 1885, d New York 23 Nov 1930. He studied piano in Dunham, Que, and in 1900 was awarded the Lord Strathcona Scholarship, which paid three years' tuition at the RCM, London.

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Peace and Friendship Treaties

Between 1725 and 1779, Britain signed a series of treaties with various Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet), Abenaki, Penobscot and Passamaquoddy peoples living in parts of what are now the Maritimes and Gaspé region in Canada and the northeastern United States. Commonly known as the Peace and Friendship Treaties, these agreements were chiefly designed to prevent war between enemies and to facilitate trade. While these treaties contained no monetary or land transfer provisions, they guaranteed hunting, fishing and land-use rights for the descendants of the Indigenous signatories. The Peace and Friendship Treaties remain in effect today.

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Barbara Godard

Barbara Godard, critic, translator, editor, educator (born at Toronto, 1942; died there 16 May 2010). Barbara Godard is one of Canada's leading authorities on literary theory, including her specialities in poststructuralism, feminism, avant-gardism, and translation studies.

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John Grew

John (Morton) Grew. Organist, harpsichordist, teacher, b Glenholme, near Truro, NS, 30 Apr 1940; LTCL 1958, Associate piano, organ (Mount Allison) 1960, B MUS (Mount Allison) 1961, M MUS (Michigan) 1966, honorary DD (United Theological College) 1987, honorary LL D (Mount Allison) 1989.

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James Kerr-Lawson

Kerr-Lawson's paintings of portraits and landscapes of the late 1880s and 1890s show the Realist-plein air influence of Jules Bastien-Lepage, while his decorative paintings from 1904 give evidence of his love of Venetian painting, specifically the work of Canaletto and Tiepolo.

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Lewis Furey

Lewis Furey (b Greenblatt). Composer, singer, pianist, violinist, actor, b Montreal, of French-US parents, 7 Jun 1949.

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Calvin Sieb

Calvin Sieb coached the strings of the Jeunesses musicales World Orchestra in 1972 in Germany, in 1975 in Belgium, and in 1978 in England.

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Roch Voisine

He recorded his first album in 1989. Hélène was a big success in Québec and a major success in France. It sold over 1 million copies and Voisine was awarded the Victoire trophy for the best album in the French-speaking world.

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André Lortie

André Lortie, tenor (born 11 May 1930 in Montreal, Quebec). André Lortie handled tragic roles as easily as comic parts. His performances of Beppe in I Pagliacci and Spoletta in Tosca established his reputation in Canada as a singer of character roles.

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CCMC

CCMC. 'Free music orchestra' formed in 1974 in Toronto as the Canadian Creative Music Collective. Only the abbreviation was in use by 1978. Defining itself as 'a composing ensemble...

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Grey Nuns

The Grey Nuns refer to six distinct Roman Catholic religious communities of women. Their origins can all be traced to the Sisters of Charity of theHôpital Général de Montréal founded by Marie-Marguerite d'Youville in the mid-18th century.