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Arthur Plamondon

(Joseph) Arthur Plamondon. Tenor, teacher, b Montreal 9 June 1881, d near Paris between 1939 and 1945; lauréat (AMQ). He studied paino with Émery Lavigne and then voice with Guillaume Couture, and became a soloist at the Montreal cathedral. He subsequently studied and gave concerts in Paris.

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Louise Hirbour

Louise Hirbour. Musicologist, teacher, b Montreal 23 May 1938; B MUS (Montreal) 1964, Certificat d'études supérieures (Sorbonne) 1966, L MUS (Montreal) 1969, D MUS (Montreal) 1975.

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Har Gobind Khorana

Har Gobind Khorana, scientist (born 9 January 1922 in Raipur, India; died 9 November 2011 in Concord, Massachusetts). His mother was illiterate and his family impoverished. His first class was in the open on the edge of the Rajasthan Desert. Khorana's brilliance was obvious early and, with scholarships, he earned degrees in organic chemistry at Punjab University. He obtained a PhD at Liverpool (1948) and then spent three years studying proteins and nucleic acids at Cambridge. In spite of his ability, his race precluded him from appointment as a professor in Britain. In search of an outstanding young scientist, Gordon Shrum, a physicist from the University of British Columbia, hired Khorana to do organic chemistry at the British Columbia Research Council in Vancouver in 1952.

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Joseph Wiseman

Joseph Wiseman, actor (b at Montréal 15 May 1918; d at Manhattan 19 Oct 2009). Joseph Wiseman is unforgettable as the titular archfiend Dr. No bent on destroying the world in the first James Bond film (1962). Wiseman often played villains of a cerebral nature.

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Andrew Bannatyne

Andrew Graham Ballenden Bannatyne, businessman, politician (born 31 October 1829 at South Ronaldsay, Orkney ; died 18 May 1889 at St Paul, Minnesota).

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Kensington Market (band)

Kensington Market. Toronto rock band, active 1967-9. Named for a downtown Toronto neighbourhood, it was formed by songwriters Keith McKie (vocals, guitar) and Eugene Martynec (guitar, piano), with Alex Darou (bass guitar) and Jimmy Watson (drums).

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Donovan Bailey

Donovan Anthony Bailey, O.Ont., track and field sprinter (born 16 December 1967 in Manchester Parish, Jamaica). Donovan Bailey won the gold medal for Canada in the men’s 100m at the 1996 Olympic Summer Games in Atlanta, Georgia, and set a world record with a time of 9.84 seconds. He later won a second Olympic gold medal when he led Team Canada to a first-place finish in the men’s 4x100m relay. During his athletic career, he also won four medals (three gold and one silver) at the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships.

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Norse Voyages

Retracing Bjarni’s route in reverse, Leif explored three distinct regions. In the north was Helluland, Land of Stone Slabs, an area that had nothing but glaciers, mountains and rock. This must be the area from the Torngat Mountains to Baffin Island.

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Clem Martini

Clem Martini, playwright (born at Calgary 25 Aug 1956). Clem Martini grew up in Bowness, Alta. As a child he loved animals, the outdoors and reading. In high school he began writing short fiction and won several awards and contests, including the Woolworths Competition, for his stories.

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Kate and Anna McGarrigle

Kate and Anna McGarrigle. Folksingers and songwriters. Born of French-Canadian and Irish parents in Montreal, the sisters Anna (b 4 Dec 1944) and Kate (b 6 Feb 1946, d 18 Jan 2010, B SC McGill 1969) studied music at the local convent.

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Ian and Sylvia

They soon became full time professionals and, with their first recording (1961), among the leaders of the folk-music boom in North America.

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Terry Clarke

Terry (Terence Michael) Clarke. Drummer, b Vancouver 20 Aug 1944. While a pupil 1960-5 of Jim Blackley in Vancouver, Clarke performed with Chris Gage, David Robbins, and others, often teamed with the bassist Don (W.) Thompson.

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Howard Dyck

In 1972 Dyck became conductor and artistic director of the Kitchener-Waterloo Philharmonic Choir (later renamed the Grand Philharmonic Choir) and in 1988 also of its Chamber Singers.

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Arthur Polson

Polson, Arthur (Ludwig). Violinist, composer, conductor, b Vancouver 2 Mar 1934, d there 25 Feb 2003. His father wrote pop songs, including 'The Hope Mountain Waltz' recorded by US bandleader Bob Crosby.

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Steve Yzerman

Stephen "Steve" Gregory Yzerman, hockey player, general manager (born 9 May 1965 in Cranbrook, BC). National Hockey League (NHL) superstar Steve Yzerman, a career Detroit Red Wing known for his exceptional sportsmanship and leadership abilities, is the longest-serving captain in the league's history. Yzerman was captain of the Detroit Red Wings from 1986 to 2006, and led the team to three Stanley Cup victories. In 2002, he won an Olympic gold medal as part of the men’s hockey team. He was also executive director of the men’s hockey teams that won Olympic gold in 2010 and 2014. Yzerman became vice president of the Detroit Red Wings following his retirement as a player, and in 2010 became general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning.

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Gary Relyea

Gary (Weston) Relyea. Bass-baritone, teacher, b Highland Park, Mich, 9 Apr 1942, naturalized Canadian 1972. Relyea studied piano at the University of Michigan and voice 1967-71 with Howell Glynne and Louis Quilico at the University of Toronto.

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Don Francks

Don Harvey Francks. Singer, actor (born 28 February 1932 in Burnaby, BC; died 3 April 2016 in Toronto, ON).