Search for "New France"

Displaying 341-360 of 5565 results
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Claude Webster

Claude Webster. Pianist, vocal coach, b Roberval, Lac-St-Jean, Que, 5 Sep 1961; B MUS (Montreal) 1983, M MUS (Montreal) 1985.

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Fernand Létourneau

Fernand (Wilfrid Joseph) Létourneau. Organ manufacturer and rebuilder, b St-Hyacinthe, Que, 24 Sep 1944. Initially he worked as a carpenter but an interest in organs attracted him to Casavant Frères into whose employ he entered in 1965. He stayed with the company for 14 years.

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Clarence Gagnon

Clarence Gagnon, engraver, painter (b at Montréal 8 Nov 1881; d there 5 Jan 1942). After studying at the École normale du Plateau in Montréal, he received his artistic training from the painter William BRYMNER at the Art Association of Montreal 1897-1900.

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Alcibiade Béique

Alcibiade Béique. Organist, teacher, b St-Jean-Baptiste-de-Rouville, near Montreal, 20 Oct 1856, d Montreal 20 Jun 1896. After organ lessons with Romain-Octave Pelletier, he studied 1877-8 at the Liège Cons and travelled in Italy, France, and England.

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Isabelle Burnada

Isabelle (b Boyer de la Giroday) Burnada. Mezzo-soprano, teacher, b Curepipe, Mauritius, 15 Feb 1899, d Vancouver 13 Mar 1972. Her parents emigrated to Canada when she was a child and settled in Mission, BC, in 1909. In 1919 she moved to Vancouver.

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Edmond Dyonnet

Edmond Dyonnet, painter, teacher (b at Crest, France 25 June 1859; d at Montréal 6 July 1954). Dyonnet studied in Turin with Gilardi and in Naples with Morelli. He came to Canada with his parents 1875.

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Jérôme Lalemant

Jérôme Lalemant, Jesuit missionary (b at Paris, France 27 Apr 1593; d at Québec City 26 Jan 1673), brother of Charles Lalemant. He arrived in Canada in 1638 and was named superior of the Huron mission.

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Black Canadians and Conscription in the First World War

In 1917, the Canadian government passed the Military Service Act, which made all male citizens (aged 20 to 45) subject to conscription. As the First World War (1914–18) dragged on, the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) desperately needed reinforcements, as the number of volunteers had nearly dried up. Earlier in the war, Black volunteers had faced resistance and opposition in their efforts to enlist. However, Black Canadians were not exempt from conscription and at least 350 were drafted into the CEF. Those who served overseas worked primarily with the Canadian Forestry Corps, although some also served on the frontlines.

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Myrtle Guerrero

Myrtle Guerrero (b Rose, later m Knox-Leet). Educator, b North Battleford, Sask, 5 Aug 1906, d Oakville, Ont, 11 Aug 1995; ATCM 1939. After private studies 1917-28 in Lethbridge, Alta, she continued her training 1928-32 at the TCM, where her piano teachers were Peter C. Kennedy and Alberto Guerrero.

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Winnie Roach-Leuszler

Winnie Roach-Leuszler, swimmer (born 3 February 1926 in Port Credit, ON; died 1 May 2004 in Surrey, BC). Winnie Roach-Leuszler was a successful marathon swimmer. In 1951, after serving with the Canadian Women’s Army Corps during the Second World War, she became the first Canadian to swim the English Channel. She also won the French long-distance championship in 1962. A recipient of the Order of Ontario, Roach-Leuszler was inducted into the Canadian Forces Sports Hall of Fame, the Ontario Aquatic Hall of Fame and the Mississauga Sports Hall of Fame.

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Jack Humphrey

Jack Weldon Humphrey, painter (b at Saint John 12 Jan 1901; d there 23 Mar 1967). Humphrey was the most significant eastern Canadian painter of his generation. He studied under Charles Hawthorne at NY's National Academy of Design

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Marie-Danielle Parent

Marie-Danielle Parent. Soprano, b Montreal 11 Mar 1954; B MUS (Sherbrooke) 1976, M MUS (Montreal) 1978. She studied voice with Louise André and staging with Charlotte Boisjoli at the University of Montreal.

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Louise Lebrun

Louise Lebrun. Soprano, b Montreal 9 Jan 1940; Artist Diploma (École Vincent-d'Indy) 1964. She studied 1956-64 at the École Vincent-d'Indy with Sister Gertrude-des-Anges and Sister Reine Décarie (voice), Roy Royal (French art songs), Bernard Diamant (Lieder), and Pierrette Alarie (stage techniques).

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German Canadians

German Canadians — that is, Canadians who report their ethnic origin as solely or partly from Germany or of German ancestry — are one of Canada's largest ethnic categories of European origin. At the time of the British Conquest of New France, nearly 200 families living in the St. Lawrence Valley were of German origin. British North America, and then Canada, would receive six waves of immigration throughout their history, the most recent of which consisted of displaced people at the end of the Second World War. In the 2016 Canadian Census, 3,322,405 Canadians (nearly 10 per cent of the population) reported German origins, and 404,745 people in the country reported German as their mother tongue. A large proportion of these respondents lived in Ontario or central Canada.

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AGLAÉ

AGLAÉ (b Jocelyne Deslongchamps). Singer, actress, b L'Épiphanie, near Montreal, 13 May 1933, d Montreal 19 Apr 1984. She began her career at 16 in Montreal nightclubs (eg, the Au Faisan doré) under the name Josette France.