Search for "New France"

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Charles Labelle

Charles Labelle. Choirmaster, composer, conductor, teacher, b Champlain, NY, 15 Aug 1849, d Montreal 21 May 1903. He studied at the Collège de Montréal, where, at 12, he was put in charge of the solfège class and was also the school organist. He became a lawyer in 1873.

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Maggie Vail Murder Case

In September 1869, berry pickers in Saint John, New Brunswick, discovered the remains of an adult and a child hidden in some bushes. The bodies were soon identified as belonging to Sarah Margaret “Maggie” Vail and her infant daughter, Ella May. Later that month, architect John A. Munroe was charged with the murder of Vail, with whom he had an affair. Although his lawyer argued that Munroe was incapable of murder given his education and social standing — an early example of the “character” defence — he was convicted in December 1869. Munroe eventually confessed to the murders and was executed in February 1870.

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Michael Hollingsworth

Michael Hollingsworth had his first play, Strawberry Fields, produced by the Factory Theatre Lab in 1972. His next, performed at Toronto Free Theatre the following year, was Clear Light. In this LSD-inspired play, 2 couples and 1 ex-husband gather for a game of cards.

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Johanna Skibsrud

A second collection of poems, I do not Think that I Could Love a Human Being, appeared in 2010. In many ways it reflects the preoccupations of the first; seemingly everyday events can form turning points in outlook or sensibility.

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Mario Pelchat

Pelchat was exposed to music early on through his parents, and sang in his local parish church choir as a boy along with his sister and father. He left his native Northern Québec region of Lac St Jean in 1981 at the age of 17 to pursue a musical career.

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Immigration to Canada

The movement of individuals of one country into another for the purpose of resettlement is central to Canadian history. The story of Canadian immigration is not one of orderly population growth; instead, it has been — and remains one — about economic development as well as Canadian attitudes and values. It has often been unashamedly economically self-serving and ethnically or racially discriminatory despite contributing to creating a multicultural society (see Immigration Policy in CanadaRefugees to Canada). Immigration has also contributed to dispossessing Indigenous peoples of their ancestral lands.

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Roger Gosselin

Roger Gosselin. Bass, director, administrator, b Drummondville, Que, 4 Mar 1919. At St-Frédéric College, Drummondville, he studied violin, trumpet, and french horn 1924-34.

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Ariane Moffatt

Ariane Moffatt, singer, songwriter and producer (born 26 April 1979 in Saint Romuald, today Lévis, QC). Ariane Moffatt sets herself apart with her urban pop style songs, whose alternately acoustic and electronic sounds lend them an airy, dreamlike quality. The recipient of numerous Félix Awards, including Revelation of the Year in 2003, she also won a Juno Award in 2009 for her album Tous les sens. That album was well received in France, where the singer has built valuable friendships in the artistic community; it also earned her the Grand Prix of the Académie Charles Cros.

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Phyllis Lambert

Phyllis Barbara Lambert (née Bronfman), CC, GOQ, FRAIC, FRSC, architect, philanthropist, curator (born 24 January 1927 in Montreal, QC). Phyllis Lambert has been called “Joan of Architecture” both for her fierce advocacy of architecture and for her work to preserve historically important architecture in Canada and internationally. She founded Heritage Montreal, the Société d’amélioration Milton-Parc (SAMP), and the internationally renowned Canadian Centre for Architecture. A strong proponent for conscious city building, urban renewal, and urban conservation, she has changed the way architects are seen and the way they work and has helped make architecture an important civic concern. She is a Companion of the Order of Canada, an Officer of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres de France, a Grand Officer of the Ordre national du Québec, and a recipient of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Gold Medal.

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Walter Boudreau

Walter Boudreau. Composer, saxophonist, conductor (born on 15 October 1947 in Montreal, Qc). He studied piano for several years in Sorel. and later saxophone with Doug Michaud in Montreal. However, he was initially self-taught as a composer. At 15, he became a member of a jazz band conducted by Arthur Romano.

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Sum 41

Sum 41. Rock band, formed in 1996 in Ajax, Ont by Deryck Whibley (vocals, guitar), Dave Baksh (guitar), Jason "Cone" McCaslin (bass) and Steve Jocz (drums).

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Antoine Dessane

Despite this, his father withdrew Antoine from the conservatoire in October 1841 and took him and his older brother on a concert tour to promote his music business, first to the USA, and then to the French provinces, Italy, Austria, and Germany.

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Raoul Jobin

Raoul (b Joseph Roméo) Jobin. Tenor, teacher, administrator, senior civil servant, b Quebec City 8 Apr 1906, d there 13 Jan 1974; honorary D MUS (Laval) 1952.

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Émile Benoit

Émile (Joseph) Benoit. Fiddler, composer, storyteller, b Black Duck Rock, Port au Port peninsula, Nfld, 24 Mar 1913, d Stephenville, Nfld, 3 Sep 1992; honorary LLD (Memorial 1988). He began playing the violin at 12 and first performed publicly at 16.

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Henri de Tonty

Henri de Tonty, explorer, voyageur (b 1649 or 1650; d at Ft Louis-de-la-Louisiane Sept 1704). He was the son of Lorenzo de Tonty, inventor of the "tontine" system of life annuity.

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Arnold Davidson Dunton

Throughout the controversies that arose over the funding and regulation of the new medium of television, Dunton was a persuasive defender of the corporation's independence and a strong advocate of the need to fund publicly a television system that would be of great national benefit.