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Lewis (Louis) Chow (Primary Source)

Lewis Chow was a Chinese Canadian conscripted to serve in Force 136, the Far East Branch of the Special Operations Executive. Chow was rushed through training and parachuted into Kuala Lumpur. However, the atomic bombings of Japan cut the war and his dangerous mission short. Read and listen to Chow describe his training and the risks he faced as an Allied undercover agent in the Japanese-occupied Malay Peninsula.

Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

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Vancouver Feature: Gassy Jack Lands on the Burrard Shore

When Capt. Jack Deighton and his family pulled their canoe onto the south shore of the Burrrard Inlet in 1867, Jack was on one more search for riches. He had been a sailor on British and American ships, rushed for gold in California and the Cariboo, piloted boats on the Fraser River and ran a tavern in New Westminster. He was broke again, but he wasted no time in starting a new business and building the settlement that would become Vancouver.

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Brandt Louie (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 25, 2002. Partner content is not updated.

In the days before business plans and vision statements, Vancouver shopkeeper Hok Yat Louie wrote, in his native Chinese, a series of letters to his sons. It was 1934 and, in failing health, he'd returned for the first time in 38 years to his birthplace in south China's Pearl River Delta.

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Reinhart Released by Rebels

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on January 25, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

Norbert Reinhart’s family was praying desperately for his release when his daughter Molly stood on a wooden pew in Our Lady of Lourdes Church in downtown Toronto. "I’m going to the mountain," said the blond two-year-old, pointing towards the dome towering above her, "to bring my daddy home.

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James Wolfe

James Wolfe, British army officer (born 2 January 1727 in Westerham, Kent, England; died 13 September 1759 near Quebec City). Wolfe fought in the War of the Austrian Succession, the suppression of the Jacobite Rebellion and the Seven Years’ War. He is best known for his role in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759. Both Wolfe and his opponent, Louis-Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm, died from wounds sustained during the battle. The British victory was a turning point in the Seven Years’ War, leading to the capture of Montreal in 1760 and the acquisition of Canada by Britain in 1763.

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Black History in Canada until 1900

Black people have lived in Canada since the beginnings of transatlantic settlement. Although historically very few arrived directly from their ancestral homeland in Africa, the term "African Canadian" is used to identify all descendants of Africa regardless of their place of birth. “Black Canadian” is also used as a more general term. The earliest arrivals were enslaved people brought from New England or the West Indies. Between 1763 and 1900, most Black migrants to Canada were fleeing enslavement in the US. (See also Black Enslavement in Canada.)

See also Black History in Canada: 1900–1960 and Black History in Canada: 1960 to Present.

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Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Ian Alistair Mackenzie, politician (b at Assynt, Scot 27 July 1890; d at Banff, Alta 2 Sept 1949). After sitting in the BC Assembly 1920-30, the gregarious Mackenzie entered Parliament in Ottawa. He was minister of national defence, 1935-39, overseeing the rearmament of Canada's armed forces.

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Canadian Peacekeepers in the Balkans

From 1991 to the present, members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and civilian police forces, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), have served in peace operations in the Balkans. Their mission was to provide security and stability following the breakup of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Nearly 40,000 Canadians have served in the Balkans, and 23 CAF members died while deployed there.

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Marie-Josée Simard

Marie-Josée Simard. Percussionist, b La Baie, near Chicoutimi, Que, 29 Nov 1956; premier prix percussion (CMM) 1979. Born into a musical family, Simard made her debut on vibraphone in her parents' orchestra in Baie-Comeau.

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Sonnet L'Abbé

Sonnet L'Abbé, poet, literary critic, teacher (born at Toronto, Ont, 24 September 1973). Sonnet L'Abbé's poetic themes of ethnicity and environmentalism display the influence of her father, a FRANCO-ONTARIAN potter, and mother, a Guyanese artist.

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Charles Gavan Power

Charles Gavan Power, "Chubby," lawyer, politician (b at Sillery, Qué 18 Jan 1888; d at Québec C 30 May 1968). Power was seriously wounded in WWI and won the Military Cross for gallantry. He denounced military "brass hats" ever after.

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Arthur Puttee

Arthur Puttee, printer, editor (b at Folkestone, Eng 25 Aug 1868; d at Winnipeg 21 Oct 1957). Puttee was Manitoba's first Labour MP, as member for Winnipeg 1900-04.

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John Edwards Leckie

John Edwards Leckie, "Jack," soldier, mining engineer, explorer (b at Acton-Vale, Qué 19 Feb 1872; d at Port Hope, Ont 7 Aug 1950). He was best known for engineering and research work around Hudson Bay. Leckie was educated at Bishop's, Royal Military College, and King's College.

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Edward Walter Scott

Edward Walter Scott, Ted, Anglican clergyman (b at Edmonton, 30 Apr 1919). Scott was educated at the University of British Columbia and Anglican Theological College, Vancouver.

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Vernon Ellis

Vernon (Austin) Ellis. Educator, pianist, adjudicator, b Port Maitland, NS, 20 Jun 1930; B MUS (Acadia) 1952, M MUS (ESM, Rochester) 1960.

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Brother Basile

Brother Basile (b Simon Néron). Ethnomusicologist, teacher, b Roberval, near Chicoutimi, Que, 18 Apr 1906, d Roma, Lesotho, Southern Africa, 5 Sep 1973; L MUS (Montreal) 1941, D MUS (Montreal) 1946. He joined the order of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart at St-Hyacinthe in 1918.

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Marie-Anne Lagimodière

Marie-Anne Lagimodière (née Gaboury), settler (born 2 August 1780 in Maskinongé, QC; died 14 December 1875 in St. Boniface, MB). Marie-Anne Lagimodière accompanied her fur-trader husband, Jean-Baptiste Lagimodière, to what is now Western Canada. She was one of the first women of European descent in the area and they became some of the first settlers in Red River. Marie-Anne Lagimodière was grandmother of Louis Riel, the Métis leader of the Red River Resistance.

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Order-in-Council P.C. 1911-1324 — the Proposed Ban on Black Immigration to Canada

Order-in-Council P.C. 1324 was approved on 12 August 1911 by the Cabinet of Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier. The purpose of the order was to ban Black persons from entering Canada for a period of one year because, it read, “the Negro race…is deemed unsuitable to the climate and requirements of Canada.” The order-in-council was the culmination of what researcher R. Bruce Shepard has called Canada’s “campaign of diplomatic racism.” Though the order never became law, the actions of government officials made it clear that Black immigrants were not wanted in Canada (see Immigration).

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Jackie Richardson

Jackie Richardson, actor, singer (born 1947 in Donora, Pennsylvania). Jackie Richardson is an award-winning singer and actor whose career spans more than five decades. She has been called Canada’s reigning queen of jazzblues and gospel, and has received a Maple Blues Award for lifetime achievement. She is also a Gemini Award and Dora Award-winning actor who has appeared in numerous musical theatre productions, films and television series. In 2014, the Toronto Star named Richardson one of 180 people who have helped shaped the city since it was founded. She was made an Honorary Member of the Order of Canada in 2021.