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Wab Kinew

Wabanakwut Kinew, hip hop artist, broadcaster, university administrator, author, politician (born 31 December 1981 in Kenora, ON). An Ojibwa activist and public intellectual, Wab Kinew began his career as a musician and rapper with the hip hop group Dead Indians. He gained national attention through his radio and television journalism for the CBC, including 8th Fire, a television series on Indigenous issues. Kinew’s 2015 memoir, The Reason You Walk, was a national bestseller and finalist for the RBC Taylor Prize. Kinew was elected to the Manitoba legislature in 2016, despite controversial tweets and rap lyrics that dogged his campaign. Similarly, revelations of stayed domestic assault charges from 2003 threatened to derail his bid to become leader of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, though he was named leader in September 2017.

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Inuit Experiences at Residential School

Residential schools were government-sponsored religious schools created to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture. Schools in the North were run by missionaries for nearly a century before the federal government began to open new, so-called modern institutions in the 1950s. This was less than a decade after a Special Joint Committee (see Indigenous Suffrage) found that the system was ineffectual. The committee’s recommendations led to the eventual closure of residential schools across the country.

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Baha'i Faith

Baha'i Faith, a world religion with members in 235 countries and territories, and with 184 National Spiritual Assemblies.

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Colored Hockey League

The Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes (CHL) was an all-Black men’s hockey league. It was organized by Black Baptists and Black intellectuals and was founded in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1895. It disbanded in 1911 and reformed in 1925 but fell apart by the 1930s. Play was known to be fast, physical and innovative. The league was designed to attract young Black men to Sunday worship with the promise of a hockey game between rival churches after the services. Later, with the influence of the Black Nationalism Movement — and with rising interest in the sport of hockey — the league came to be seen as a potential driving force for the equality of Black Canadians. Canada Post issued a commemorative stamp in honour of the league in January 2020.

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Igor Gouzenko

Igor Sergeievitch Gouzenko, Soviet intelligence officer, author (born 26 January 1919 in Rogachev, Russia; died 25 June 1982 in Mississauga, ON). Igor Gouzenko was a Soviet cipher clerk stationed at the Soviet Union’s Ottawa embassy during the Second World War. Just weeks after the end of the war, Gouzenko defected to the Canadian government with proof that his country had been spying on its wartime allies: Canada, Britain and the United States. This prompted what is known as the Gouzenko Affair. Gouzenko sought asylum for himself and his family in Canada. His defection caused a potentially dangerous international crisis. Many historians consider it the beginning of the Cold War.

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Phil Edwards

Philip Aron “Phil” Edwards, runner, physician (born 23 September 1907 in Georgetown, British Guiana [now Guyana]; died 6 September 1971 in Montréal, QC). Nicknamed the “Man of Bronze,” middle distance runner Phil Edwards won five bronze medals at three Olympic Games in the 4x400m relay (1928 and 1932), 800m (1932 and 1936) and 1,500m (1932).

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Valerie Tryon

Valerie Tryon. Pianist, teacher, b Portsmouth, England, 5 Sep 1934, naturalized Canadian 1986; ARCM 1948, LRAM 1948, FRAM 1984, hon LWCM (Conservatory Canada) 1991, hon D LITT (McMaster) 2000.

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Denise Fujiwara

She created Fujiwara Dance Inventions in 1991 to continue her solo projects. Notably in 1993, she began studying butoh with master choreographer and performer Natsu Nakajima. Nakajima created her interpretation of Motomasa's 15th century Noh play, Sumida River, for Fujiwara.

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Monique Leyrac

Monique Leyrac, née Tremblay, singer, actress (b at Montréal 26 Feb 1928). Monique Leyrac's fortunate combination of musical and theatrical talents have enabled her to imbue her performances with emotional intensity.

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Albert Frank Moritz

Albert Frank Moritz, poet, professor (b 15 Apr 1947 at Niles, Ohio, US). A.F. Moritz attended Marquette University (Wisconsin), where he earned a BA in journalism and a MA and PhD in English literature. Since 1974 he has lived in Toronto, where he is a professor at the University of Toronto.

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Caro Lamoureux

Caro (Marie Julienne Pauline Caroline) Lamoureux. Soprano, b Montreal 3 Jan 1904, d there 11 Aug 1998. She studied voice with Céline Marier and stage technique with Jeanne Maubourg and Albert Roberval.

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Bishop Emile Grouard

Monseigneur Émile Grouard was energetic and inventive, having steamboats built on the Peace, Slave and Athabasca rivers. He was also respected by the Indigenous peoples of his diocese, and came to learn the Cree, Denesuline (Chipewyan) and Dane-zaa (Beaver) languages.

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Vanessa Harwood

Known for her interpretation of leading roles inSwan Lake, The Dying Swan, Coppélia and Elite Syncopations, Harwood is admired for her virtuosity and her seductive stage presence.

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Nora Clench

Esther Leonora Clench, violinist (born 6 May 1867 in St. Marys, ON; died 17 May 1938 in Toorak, Australia).

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John Patrick Savage

In the 1972 and 1979 federal elections Savage ran unsuccessfully for the Liberals. He was elected to the Dartmouth School Board in 1978 and became its chairman in 1984. A self-styled social activist, he strongly advocated social issues and became a popular board member.

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Cavalia

Cavalia, equestrian troop (Shawinigan, 2000 -). Cavalia was conceived by the visionary Normand Latourelle, who had already participated in the CIRQUE DU SOLEIL venture.

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Laurence L. Kent

Kent's early films received limited distribution and were virtually forgotten until they were included in a retrospective of Canadian cinema at the Toronto Festival of Festivals (seeFILM FESTIVALS) in 1984.