Search for "south asian canadians"

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Robert Weisz

Robert Weisz. Pianist, teacher, b Arad, Rumania, 25 Jun 1925, of Hungarian parents, naturalized Swiss 1963 and Canadian 1975; prix de virtuosité (Geneva Cons) 1949.

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Joyce Sands

Joyce Sands (b Feldtmann). Cellist, teacher, b Clairmont, Western Australia, 6 Mar 1902; naturalized Canadian 1935, d Victoria, BC, 11 Jan 1984; LRAM 1919. Raised in England she studied cello there with Hélène Dolmetsch and 1920-4 in Belgium at the Royal Flemish Cons, Antwerp, with Arnold Godene.

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Walter Ostanek

Walter (b Ladislav John) Ostanek. Accordionist, composer, b Duparquet, near Rouyn, Que, of Yugoslavian parents, 20 Apr 1935. Raised in St Catharines, Ont, he began playing button accordion at nine and turned to piano accordion at 12.

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Gisele MacKenzie

Gisele MacKenzie, born Gisèle LaFlèche, actress (born at Winnipeg 10 Jan 1927; died Burbank, Ca 5 Sep 2003). Gisèle LaFlèche, sometimes known as "Canada's first lady of song," began in show business playing the violin in Winnipeg and on a scholarship at the Toronto Conservatory of Music.

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Guido Nincheri

Guido Nincheri, stained glass artist (b at Prato, Italy on 29 Sept 1885; d at Providence, Rhode Island on 1 Mar 1973), was possibly the most prolific religious artist in Canada during the 20th century. His stained glass and decorative work graces innumerable churches across the country as well as many New England states.

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Zara Nelsova

Zara (b Sarah) Nelsova (b Nelson or Katznelson). Cellist, teacher, b Winnipeg 23 Dec 1918, naturalized US 1953, d New York 10 Oct 2002; honorary LLD (Winnipeg) 1985; honorary ARCT 1986; honorary D MUS (Smith College) 1992.

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Jan Rubes

In 1948 Rubeš emigrated to Canada and gave his first Canadian performance as Betto in Gianni Schicchi with the Royal Conservatory Opera (University of Toronto Opera Division).

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Robert Goulet

Robert (Gerard) Goulet. Baritone, actor, born Lawrence, Mass, 26 Nov 1933 of French-Canadian parents, died Los Angeles 30 Oct 2007.

Macleans

John Paul II Challenged Tyranny

THERE WERE NO INQUISITIONS, no holy crusades, no emperors kneeling in the snow. But when John Paul II took the stage in Warsaw on a sunny day in June 1979, he was challenging an empire as surely as medieval pontiffs grappled with the secular powers of their age.

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Cougar Annie

Ada Annie Rae-Arthur (née Jordan), (a.k.a. Cougar Annie), pioneer, businesswoman (born 19 June 1888 in Sacramento, California; died 28 April 1985 in Port Alberni, BC). Ada Rae-Arthur was a pioneer who cleared approximately 5 acres (2 hectares) of land along the northern shore of Clayoquot Sound, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. She ran a successful nursery, post office and general store from her homestead. There, she birthed 11 children, outlived four husbands and became known for allegedly shooting and killing about 70 cougars in her lifetime. Today, Cougar Annie’s Garden is owned and operated by the Boat Basin Foundation to preserve her legacy and promote natural history.

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Shaaw Tláa (Kate Carmack)

Shaaw Tláa (a.k.a Kate Carmack), (born c. 1857-1867 near present-day Bennett Lake, YT; died 29 March 1920 in Carcross, YT). A Tagish woman, Shaaw Tláa (pronounced Shaw Claw) was part of the group that discovered gold near the Klondike River in 1896, sparking the Klondike Gold Rush. She and her husband George Carmack, a white American, had spent a decade in search of gold in the Yukon. They made $1 million from their gold claim; however, George later abandoned her and she was unsuccessful in suing for her half of the fortune.

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Jackie Shane

Jackie Shane, singer (born 15 May 1940 in Nashville, Tennessee; died 22 February 2019 in Nashville). Jackie Shane was a pioneering transgender performer who was a prominent figure in Toronto’s R&B scene in the 1960s. Her cover of William Bell’s “Any Other Way” reached No. 2 on the CHUM singles chart in 1963. Her 1967 live album, Jackie Shane Live, was reissued in 2015 and was shortlisted for the Polaris Music Prize’s 1960–1970 Heritage Award. Any Other Way, an anthology album of songs from Shane’s career and monologues from her live shows, was released in 2017. It was nominated for a 2019 Grammy Award for Best Historical Album. Shane is featured in a public mural in downtown Toronto commemorating the Yonge Street music scene of the 1960s.

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Prince William (HRH The Duke of Cambridge)

​His Royal Highness (HRH) The Duke of Cambridge (Prince William), second in line to the thrones of Canada, the United Kingdom and 13 other Commonwealth realms (born 21 June 1982 in London, United Kingdom). The Duke of Cambridge is a grandson of Her Majesty (HM) The Queen and the elder son of the heir to the throne, HRH The Prince of Wales (The Prince Charles)and the late Diana, Princess of Wales. As the leading member of the youngest working generation of the royal family, William has contributed to modernizing the monarchy’s image for the 21st century by his willingness to update royal traditions. He is married to Catherine Middleton, now the Duchess of Cambridge, and has three children, Prince George of Cambridge (born 22 July 2013), Princess Charlotte of Cambridge (born 2 May 2015), and Prince Louis of Cambridge (born 23 April 2018).

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The Bells

The Bells (The Five Bells 1965-70). Montreal-based pop group active predominantly 1965-73.

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Phil Edwards

Philip Aron “Phil” Edwards, runner, physician (born 23 September 1907 in Georgetown, British Guiana [now Guyana]; died 6 September 1971 in Montréal, QC). Nicknamed the “Man of Bronze,” middle distance runner Phil Edwards won five bronze medals at three Olympic Games in the 4x400m relay (1928 and 1932), 800m (1932 and 1936) and 1,500m (1932).

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Igor Gouzenko

Igor Sergeievitch Gouzenko, Soviet intelligence officer, author (born 26 January 1919 in Rogachev, Russia; died 25 June 1982 in Mississauga, ON). Igor Gouzenko was a Soviet cipher clerk stationed at the Soviet Union’s Ottawa embassy during the Second World War. Just weeks after the end of the war, Gouzenko defected to the Canadian government with proof that his country had been spying on its wartime allies: Canada, Britain and the United States. This prompted what is known as the Gouzenko Affair. Gouzenko sought asylum for himself and his family in Canada. His defection caused a potentially dangerous international crisis. Many historians consider it the beginning of the Cold War.