Search for "New France"

Displaying 3421-3440 of 5380 results
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Lorne Albert Pierce

Lorne Albert Pierce, publisher, editor, writer (b at Delta, Ont 3 Aug 1890: d at Toronto 27 Nov 1961). Editor in chief of RYERSON PRESS 1922-60, Pierce championed Canadian writers and writing for over 40 years.

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Kevin Austin

Kevin Austin. Composer, teacher, b London 10 Jul 1948, naturalized Canadian 1984; B MUS composition (McGill) 1970, MMA composition (McGill) 1973. He studied composition and electroacoustics at McGill University with István Anhalt, Paul Pedersen, Alcides Lanza, and Bengt Hambraeus.

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Robert Prescott

Robert Prescott, soldier, colonial administrator (b in Lancashire, Eng c 1726; d at Rose Green, W Sussex, Eng 21 Dec 1815). He joined the British army in 1745 and saw service during the SEVEN YEARS' WAR at Louisbourg in 1758. He

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Lawrence Mason

Lawrence Mason. Critic, b Chicago 8 Oct 1882, d Toronto 9 Dec 1939; PH D (Yale) 1916. He studied at Harvard U and Yale U and taught English at the latter for 17 years before his appointment in 1924 as music and drama critic for the Toronto Globe (after 1936 the Globe and Mail).

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Virginia Garrison

Virginia (Hope) Garrison. Ethnomusicologist, teacher, b Indianapolis, Ind, 6 Jun1938; B SC (Ball State) 1960, M MUS (Michigan) 1966, PH D (Wisconsin) 1985.

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Richard Semmens

Richard (Templar) Semmens. Musicologist, teacher, b Vancouver, BC, 27 Dec 1950; B MUS (British Columbia) 1973, M MUS (British Columbia) 1975, PH D (Stanford) 1980.

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Percival Price

 Frank Percival Price, carillonneur, campanologist, composer (b at Toronto 7 Oct 1901; d at Ann Arbor, Mich 10 Oct 1985).

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Robert Austin Scott

Robert Austin Scott, painter (b at Melfort, Sask 16 May 1941). Robert Scott studied fine art at the Alberta College of Art, Calgary (1969) and the University of Alberta (1976). He is one of a group of prairie abstract artists

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Dionysos

Dionysos. Rock group established in Montreal in 1969 consisting of Paul-André Thibert (voice, recorder), Éric Clément (guitars), Jean-Pierre Legault (bass guitar), replaced by Fernand Durand in 1971, Robert Lepage (drums), and André (keyboardist) Mathieu (electronic keyboards).

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Glenn Buhr

Glenn Arthur Buhr, composer (b at Winnipeg 18 Dec 1954). After graduating in music from the University of Manitoba (1979), the University of British Columbia (1981) and the University of Michigan (1984), Buhr began to teach at Wilfrid Laurier University in 1984.

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Avis Phillips

Avis (Ruth) Phillips. Soprano, teacher, b Winnipeg 16 Nov 1900, d Vancouver 7 Mar 1986; ATCM 1918, ARCM voice 1925, ARCM piano 1925. After piano studies in Mount Forest, Ont, with Alice Roger Collins, she attended the RCM 1921-5 under Aubyn Raymar (piano) and Edith Grepe (voice).

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Philip Rista Nimmons

Philip Rista Nimmons, "Phil", jazz musician, music educator (b at Kamloops, BC 3 June 1923). Phil Nimmons began his career in Vancouver as a jazz clarinetist in dance bands and on CBC radio during the 1940s.

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Clara Lichtenstein

Clara Lichtenstein. Pianist, teacher, b Budapest, ca 1860, d Dorset, England, 3 May 1946. Born into a musical family, she studied at the Charlotte Square Institute in Edinburgh, founded by her uncle, George Lichtenstein. Her first public performance was in piano duets with Sir Charles Hallé in 1880.

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Clarence Augustus Chant

Clarence Augustus Chant, professor of astrophysics (b at Hagerman's Corners, Ont 31 May 1865; d at Observatory House, Richmond Hill, Ont 18 Nov 1956). He is often called the "father of Canadian astronomy" because he trained so many young astronomers.

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Northwest Coast Indigenous Art

More than 3,000 years ago, Indigenous peoples of the coast of British Columbia (and adjacent areas of Washington State and southeastern Alaska) such as the Haida and Kwakwaka'wakw developed artistic traditions that are heralded throughout the world for their imaginative and stylistic qualities.

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Fathers of Confederation

Thirty-six men are traditionally regarded as the Fathers of Confederation. They represented the British North American colonies at one or more of the conferences that led to Confederation and the creation of the Dominion of Canada. These meetings included the Charlottetown Conference (September 1864), the Quebec Conference (October 1864) and the London Conference (December 1866 to March 1867). Beyond the original 36 men, the subject of who should be included among the Fathers of Confederation has been a matter of some debate. The definition can be expanded to include those who were instrumental in the creation of Manitoba, bringing British Columbia and Newfoundland into Confederation, and the creation of Nunavut. (See also  Fathers of Confederation: Table.)