Search for "New France"

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Stephen Humbert

Stephen Humbert. Hymnodist, church musician, ship builder, baker, b New Jersey 1766 or 1767, d Saint John, NB, 16 Jan 1849. A Loyalist, Humbert arrived in New Brunswick in 1783. He was granted a plot of land in Saint John in 1785 and lived on it until his death.

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Léon Bellefleur

Léon Bellefleur, painter, engraver (b at Montréal 8 Feb 1910; d there 22 Feb 2007). After receiving a teaching diploma in 1929, Léon Bellefleur took evening classes at the École des beaux-arts de Montréal until 1938 and in 1940 met Alfred PELLAN.

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Jean Le Buis

Jean Le Buis. Organist, teacher, composer, b Verdun (Montreal) 30 Nov 1956; premier prix analysis (CMM) 1980, premier prix organ (CMM) 1981, premier prix organ (Rueil-Malmaison Cons) 1983.

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Ian Hugh Wallace

Ian Hugh Wallace, artist (born at Shoreham, England 25 Aug 1943). He moved to Canada in 1944 and is an influential Vancouver artist and teacher known for his conceptual art, painting, photographic murals and critical writings.

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Marcel Barbeau

Marcel Barbeau, painter, sculptor, filmmaker (born 18 February 1925 in Montréal, QC; died 2 January 2016 in Montréal). One of the original signatories of Refus global, Barbeau was an active member of the Automotistes led by Paul-Émile Borduas.

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John Burke

John (Joseph) Burke. Composer, teacher, b Toronto 10 May 1951; B MUS (McGill) 1974, M MUS (Michigan) 1976, DMA (Michigan) 1983.

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Paula Ross

Paula Ross (stage name), choreographer and dancer; born Pauline Cecilia Isobel Teresa Campbell (Vancouver 29 Apr 1941).

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Paul-André Fortier

In 1987 he and Daniel Jackson launched a repertory company, MONTRÉAL DANSE, where Fortier choreographed and co-directed until 1989, when he accepted a faculty position teaching choreography at the Université du Québec à Montréal.

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André Jobin

André Jobin, tenor, actor, stage designer (born 20 January 1933 in Québec, QC). The son of tenor, Raoul Jobin, André began his artistic training in Paris, France. André had a successful career as a singer and actor, and he performed in operas and operettas throughout Europe and North America (see Opera Performance).

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Scott St John

St John began violin studies with Richard Lawrence in London at the age of 3. He later studied viola with Ralph Aldrich at the University of Western Ontario.

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Kanyen'kehà:ka (Mohawk)

Kanyen'kehà:ka or Kanien'kehá:ka (“People of the Chert”), commonly known as Mohawk by non-Kanyen'kehà:ka, are Indigenous peoples in North America. They are the easternmost member of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, also referred to as the Iroquois or Six Nations Confederacy. In the early years of the 17th century, they resided on the banks of the Mohawk River in what is now upstate New York. They became intensely involved in the fur trade and in the colonial conflicts of the next two centuries. Many had moved to the St. Lawrence River before 1700 and following the American Revolution, the remainder moved to Canada to reside in territories controlled by their ally, Great Britain. Here, the Kanyen'kehà:ka have garnered a reputation of militancy in maintaining their language and culture, and for defending their rights.

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Félix Leclerc

Félix Eugène Leclerc, OC, GOQ, singer-songwriter, poet, novelist, playwright, actor, broadcaster (born 2 August 1914 at La Tuque, QC; died 8 August 1988 at Ȋle d'Orléans, QC). Félix Leclerc was a revolutionary artist whose work in several fields marked a turning point in Quebec culture. As a poet and playwright, he was one of Quebec’s literary giants. As a singer, he was a superstar in Canada and Europe, particularly in France. He greatly influenced the course of the Québec chanson and paved the way for the popular chansonnier movement in Quebec and France. He was a vocal proponent of Quebec nationalism and helped galvanize the collective identity of the people of Quebec. Some of his most popular songs included “Notre sentier,” “Moi, mes souliers,” “Bozo” and “Le Tour de l’Ȋle.” He received three Grand Prix du disque from the Académie Charles-Cros in Paris, as well as the Prix de musique Calixa-Lavallée, the Prix Denise-Pelletier and the Diplôme d'honneur. He was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Grand Officer of the National Order of Québec and a Chevalier of France's Légion d'honneur.

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John Graves Simcoe

John Graves Simcoe, army officer, lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada (born 25 February 1752 in Cotterstock, Britain; died 26 October 1806 in Exeter, Britain). Simcoe served as an officer with the British army in the American Revolutionary War, but is best known to Canadians as the first lieutenant-governor of the new British colony of Upper Canada, which later became Ontario.

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Charlie Martin

Charles Cromwell Martin, DCM, MM, farmer, soldier, civil servant, author (born 18 December 1918 in Wales; died 13 October 1997 in Mississauga, ON). During the Second World War, Warrant Officer Class II (WO II) Charlie Martin was awarded both the Distinguished Conduct Medal and Military Medal. Martin’s "Battle Diary" memoirs, first released in 1994, remain among the most vivid portrayals of the lives of ordinary Canadian soldiers in the war.

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Luc Plamondon

Luc Plamondon. Lyricist, producer, b St-Raymond-de-Portneuf, near Quebec City, 2 Mar 1942; BEd (Laval), honorary D LITT (Laval) 1994. Luc Plamondon grew up listening to the "turlutes" (comic ritornelles) of La Bolduc at his aunt's home in Limoilou; he wrote his first song at age 16.