Search for "black history"

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Macleans

Betty Goodwin (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on November 30, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

Betty Goodwin draws on the skin of things. She makes art with flattened shrouds of disembodied clothes, old vests pressed into paper like dried flowers. She stitches scars onto a black tarpaulin that hangs folded, with ropes dangling, like a stage curtain.

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Fritz Brandtner

Fritz Brandtner, painter (b at Danzig [Gdansk, Poland], Germany 28 July 1896; d at Montréal 7 Nov 1969). Generally considered to have introduced German expressionism to Canada, Brandtner was trained in Berlin and came to Winnipeg in 1928. He worked as a house painter until L.L.

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Haywire

Haywire. Hard rock band, formed in Charlottetown in 1982 by singer Paul MacAusland, guitarist Marvin Birt, keyboard player David Rashad, and bassist Ron Switzer. Sean Kilbride was the last in a succession of drummers.

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Valérie

Valérie (1969), the first of a group of erotic films now known as "maple-syrup porno," launched the career of director Denis HÉROUX.

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Laura Salverson

Laura Salverson, née Goodman, novelist (b at Winnipeg 9 Dec 1890; d at Toronto 13 July 1970). Daughter of Icelandic immigrants, she lived throughout western Canada after her marriage to George Salverson in 1913.

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Brother Basile

Brother Basile (b Simon Néron). Ethnomusicologist, teacher, b Roberval, near Chicoutimi, Que, 18 Apr 1906, d Roma, Lesotho, Southern Africa, 5 Sep 1973; L MUS (Montreal) 1941, D MUS (Montreal) 1946. He joined the order of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart at St-Hyacinthe in 1918.

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Frederic Hubert Soward

Frederic Hubert Soward, historian, educator (b at Minden, Ont 10 Apr 1899; d at Vancouver 1 Jan 1985). Educated at Toronto, Edinburgh and Oxford, he taught history at UBC 1922-64 (head of department, 1953-63).

Macleans

Moses Znaimer (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on May 8, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

"Far-fetched nonsense," scoffed The Globe and Mail’s John Doyle, while The Toronto Star’s Greg Quill dismissed him as "an outrageous pompous bore, a self-promoting Big Brother talking down to us all.

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John McDermott

John (Charles) McDermott. Tenor, popular singer, b Glasgow, Scotland, 25 March 1955. John McDermott emigrated from Glasgow to Canada with his family in 1965.

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Clement Virgo

Clement Virgo, director, producer, writer (b at Montego Bay, Jamaica 1 June 1966). Clement Virgo came with his family to Canada in 1977 and attended West Preparatory Public School in north Toronto before the family moved to Regent Park, the city's largest public-housing estate, known for its troubles with drugs and crime.

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Jean Béliveau

Joseph Jean Arthur “Le Gros Bill” Béliveau, CC, GOQ, hockey player (born 31 August 1931 in Trois-Rivières, QC; died 2 December 2014 in Longueuil, QC). Jean Béliveau was one of the most iconic players in the history of the Montreal Canadiens and the National Hockey League (NHL). The fourth player in NHL history to score 500 goals and the second to amass 1,000 points, he was awarded the Hart Trophy (1956, 1964), the Art Ross Trophy (1956) and the Conn Smythe Trophy (1965). His 17 Stanley Cups wins — 10 as a player and 7 as a team executive — is an unequalled NHL record. A member of the Hockey Hall of Fame and Canada’s Walk of Fame, Béliveau was made a Companion of the Order of Canada and a Grand Officer of the Ordre national du Québec. He is widely regarded as one of the best and most gracious players in NHL history, a renowned ambassador for the game of hockey.

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Indian Agents in Canada

Indian agents were the Canadian government’s representatives on First Nations reserves from the 1830s to the 1960s. Often working in isolated locations far from settler communities, Indian agents implemented government policy, enforced and administered the provisions of the Indian Act, and managed the day-to-day affairs of Status Indians. Today, the position of Indian agent no longer exists, as First Nations manage their own affairs through modern band councils or self-government.

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Norman Eric Webster

Norman Eric Webster, journalist (b at Summerside, PEI 4 June 1941). Educated at Bishops College School and then at Bishops U, Webster won a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford. Returning to Canada, he joined The Globe and Mail and served successfully in the newspaper's bureaus in Québec C and Ottawa.

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Jian Ghomeshi

Jian Ghomeshi, singer, songwriter, musician, broadcaster, writer, manager (born 9 June 1967 in London, England). Jian Ghomeshi was a member of the quirky, alternative pop-folk group Moxy Früvous from 1990 to 2001. He parlayed that recognition into a radio and television career with the CBC, hosting such entertainment talk shows as >play, The National Playlist and Q. He wrote a best-selling memoir, 1982 (2012), about growing up as an Iranian Canadian in Thornhill, Ontario, and stayed active in the music business as an artist manager. His career and national profile unravelled in the fall of 2014 when he was fired by the CBC and charged with sexual assault in incidents involving several women (see Jian Ghomeshi Case).

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Frank Calder

Frank Sellick Calder, hockey executive (born 17 November 1877 in Bristol, England; died 4 February 1943 in Montreal, QC). Frank Calder served as president of the National Hockey League (NHL) from its founding in 1917 until his sudden death in 1943. During his tenure, the league expanded into major US cities and cemented itself as the top tier of professional hockey. The NHL’s rookie-of-the-year award (Calder Memorial Trophy) and the American Hockey League’s championship trophy (Calder Cup) are both named in his honour. Calder was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.

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Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull (Tatanka Iyotake in the Lakota language, meaning literally “Buffalo Bull Who Sits Down”), Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux chief (born in 1831; died 15 December 1890 at Standing Rock, South Dakota). Sitting Bull led the Dakota (Sioux) resistance against US incursion into traditional territory. After the most famous battle at Little Big Horn, in which General George Custer’s forces were completely annihilated, Sitting Bull left the United States for the Cypress Hills in Saskatchewan. Sitting Bull symbolized the conflict between settlers and Indigenous culture over lifestyles, land and resources.