Search for "black history"

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Macleans

Deborah Cox (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on July 19, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

Deborah Cox, casually dressed in slacks and a turtleneck sweater, gesticulates wildly as she recounts the chichi gathering she attended recently at the Versace mansion in Miami.

Macleans

Simpson Re-emerges

He declined to testify in his own defence, and for months he dodged the media, first committing to - and then sidestepping - scheduled interviews like a running back avoiding tackles. Last week, O. J. Simpson finally sat down for a live TV interview.

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John Craig

John Craig, writer (b at Peterborough, ON 1921; d at same, 1982). John Craig began and ended his life in PETERBOROUGH, Ontario. The son of a newspaperman, he knew the grim realities of the DEPRESSION, but as an adventurous boy he was free to explore the nearby WATERWAYS.

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Daniel Grafton Hill

Daniel Grafton Hill, OC, O Ont, human rights specialist, historian, public servant (born 23 November 1923 in Independence, Missouri; died 26 June 2003 in Toronto, ON).

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D.O.A.

D.O.A. Vancouver punk/rock band. The band was formed in 1978 by the singer, guitarist and songwriter Joey Keighley (also known professionally as Joey Shithead and Joey Keithley, born Burnaby, BC, 3 Jun 1956), previously of The Skulls.

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Robert Bringhurst

Robert Bringhurst, poet, translator, linguist, critic, typographer, book designer (b at Los Angeles, US 16 Oct 1946). The son of a migrant couple, Robert Bringhurst was raised in communities throughout Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Alberta, and British Columbia.

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Immigration to Canada

The movement of individuals of one country into another for the purpose of resettlement is central to Canadian history. The story of Canadian immigration is not one of orderly population growth; instead, it has been — and remains one — about economic development as well as Canadian attitudes and values. It has often been unashamedly economically self-serving and ethnically or racially discriminatory despite contributing to creating a multicultural society (see Immigration Policy in CanadaRefugees to Canada). Immigration has also contributed to dispossessing Indigenous peoples of their ancestral lands.

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Herb Carnegie

Herbert H. Carnegie, CMO Ont, hockey player, philanthropist (born 8 November 1919 in Toronto, ON; died 9 March 2012 in Toronto). Arguably the first Black Canadian hockey star, Herb Carnegie is widely regarded as the best Black player never to play in the National Hockey League (NHL). Carnegie played in the 1940s and 1950s, mostly in the Quebec and Ontario Junior A and senior leagues. He was a member of the Black Aces, the first all-Black line in hockey outside the Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes. Following his retirement from hockey in 1954, he established the Herbert H. Carnegie Future Aces Foundation. He was also an accomplished senior golfer. A Member of the Order of Canada, Carnegie was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.

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Dancers of Damelahamid

The Dancers of Damelahamid are a First Nations dance collective from the Northwest coast of British Columbia, traditional territories of the Gitksan nation. Damelahamid refers to the origins of the first ancestor, Hagbegwatku, and the land granted the Gitksan when their ancestors were placed on earth. It is a geographic location near Hazelton, BC, where the 'Ksan Historical Village and Museum is found.

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Lorena Gale

Lorena Gale, actor, playwright, activist (born 9 May 1958 in Montreal, QC; died 21 June 2009 in Vancouver, BC). Lorena Gale was an award-winning actor and playwright who achieved a strong body of work in Canadian theatre. Her acclaimed 1995 play Angélique tells the story of Marie-Joseph Angélique, an enslaved Black woman who was hanged in Montreal for arson in 1734. Gale spent a season with the Shaw Festival and served as artistic director of Montreal’s Black Theatre Workshop. She also appeared in more than 130 films and television series. In 2009, the Union of BC Performers created the Lorena Gale Woman of Distinction Award in her honour.