Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 341-360 of 2104 results
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Jennifer Holness

Jennifer Holness, producer, screenwriter, director (born 1969 in Montego Bay, Jamaica). Jennifer Holness is the president and co-founder of Hungry Eyes Film & Television, which specializes in telling stories that engage with social issues and representations of Black Canadians. Her credits as producer include the award-winning Love, Sex, and Eating the Bones (2003), Home Again (2012), the Gemini Award-winning miniseries Guns (2009) and the award-winning feature documentary Stateless (2020).

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Sir William Dillon Otter

Sir William Dillon Otter, soldier (b at Clinton, Ont 3 Dec 1843; d at Toronto 6 May 1929). A veteran of the Battle of RIDGEWAY in 1866 and a part-time soldier, Otter joined the permanent force in 1883.

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Sam Steele

Sir Samuel Benfield Steele, CB, KCMG, mounted policeman, soldier (born 5 January 1848 in Medonte, Canada West; died 30 January 1919 in London, England). As a member of the North-West Mounted Police, Steele was an important participant in the signing of Treaty 6 and Treaty 7, the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, the North-West Rebellion and the Klondike gold rush. His military career began as a private in the Red River Expedition, included service in the South African War as an officer commanding Lord Strathcona’s Horse and as a major general during the First World War.

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Gerald Tailfeathers

Gerald Tailfeathers, artist (born at Stand Off, Alberta 13 or 14 Feb 1925; died at Blood IR, Alberta 3 Apr 1975). One of the first Indigenous Canadians to become a professional artist, he came to prominence in the 1950s.

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Yann Martel

Yann Martel, CC, novelist, short-story writer (born 25 June 1963 in Salamanca, Spain). A francophone who writes in English, Yann Martel is best known for the international bestseller Life of Pi (2001). It won the prestigious Man Booker Prize and was adapted into an Academy Award-winning film of the same name. Martel has also won the Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction, the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature and a Coventry Inspiration Book Award. He was made a Companion of the Order of Canada in 2021.

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Edward A. Watson

Edward A. Watson, veterinarian, pathologist, researcher (b in Devon, Eng 2 Jan 1879; d at Victoria 12 Mar 1945). He came to Canada in 1896 and, with a brother, homesteaded in Saskatchewan.

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André Asselin

(Paul) André Asselin. Pianist, composer, writer, born Montreal, 25 Feb 1923, died Montreal 26 Jan 2012. He began piano study with Auguste Descarries and, on two scholarships (1945,1946) from the TCM (RCMT) studied with Ernest Seitz and Lubka Kolessa.

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Stories of Remembrance: Paul Gross

In 2005, to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the end of the Second World War, Canadian celebrities spoke about the meaning of remembrance as part of the Stories of Remembrance Campaign, a project of CanWest News Service (now Postmedia News), the Dominion Institute (now Historica Canada) and Veterans Affairs Canada. This article is reprinted from that campaign.

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Dave Broadfoot

Dave Broadfoot, humorist, writer, performer, producer, director (born 5 December 1925 in Vancouver, BC; died 1 November 2016). Dave Broadfoot is an internationally known comedian who has probably provoked more laughter from Canadians than any performing artist in English Canada.

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Robert Morgan

Robert Morgan. Music and instrument dealer 1861-84 in Quebec City. In addition to retailing, the firm published sheet music, mostly for piano, by such Canadians as Napoléon Crépault, Damis Paul, G. Raineri, Moritz Relle, Octave Tourangeau, and Joseph Vézina.

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Guy Lombardo

In 1924 they took the name Royal Canadians. Their New Year's Eve broadcasts from New York's Roosevelt Grill (1929-62), and later the Waldorf Astoria, were a traditional part of North American celebrations, known especially for their theme "Auld Lang Syne.

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Sonja Gaudet

Sonja Gaudet (née Melis), Paralympic wheelchair curler (born 22 July 1966 in North Vancouver, British Columbia). A three-time Paralympian, Gaudet won gold for Canada at the 2006 Paralympic Winter Games in Turin, at the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games in Vancouver and at the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi. She is the first wheelchair curlerever to win multiple Paralympic gold medals. She is also a three-time world champion, having helped Canada win gold at the World Wheelchair Curling Championship in 2009, 2011 and 2013. Gaudet has been inducted into the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame and the BC Sports Hall of Fame. She was named to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame on 27 May 2020 and will be formally inducted in 2021.

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Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War

In 1939, Canada found itself at war for the second time in a generation. As in the First World War (1914-18), thousands of Indigenous soldiers and nurses volunteered for the war effort at home and abroad, serving with distinction in the Canadian army, navy, and air force. At least 4,250 First Nations soldiers enlisted in the Canadian military in the Second World War, with thousands more Métis, Inuit, and non-Status Indian soldiers serving without official recognition of their Indigenous identity.

Macleans

John Sopinka (Obituary)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 8, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

During the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, two Canadians who had become lost on the city’s streets set off in search of a ride. Rounding a corner, they spotted a parked and empty bus, the keys in the ignition.

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Cayuga

The Cayuga (also known as Guyohkohnyo and Gayogohó:no', meaning “People of the Pipe” or “People of the Great Swamp”) are Indigenous peoples who have traditionally occupied territories along the northern shore of the St. Lawrence River and south into the Finger Lakes district of New York State. The Cayuga are one of six First Nations that make up the Haudenosaunee Confederacy.

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German Music in Canada

In 1986 Canadians of German descent formed the fifth largest ethnic group in Canada - after French, English, Scottish, and Irish. In 1986 the figure was approximately 900,000 of German origin and an estimated 1,700,000 with German-speaking ancestors from various parts of Europe.