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Macleans

Cinar Scandal

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 20, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

As first days at the office go, it was the most bizarre in Peter Moss's career. On March 6, he reported for his first day as president of entertainment for Montreal-based children's TV programmer Cinar Corp. Moss arrived to find "the whole place had been turned upside down," he recalls.

Macleans

Bombardier's Success Story

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 11, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

In the aviation world, they still talk in hushed tones about the telephone call - the one in which BOMBARDIER Inc. coolly walked away from a billion-dollar sale. It happened in June, when all of the industry’s major players were gathered at the Paris Air Show.

Macleans

Merrill Lynch Buys Midland Walwyn

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on July 6, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

How's this for a long-range forecast? In 1989-1990, when a mid-sized Canadian investment brokerage called Midland Doherty Financial Corp. was running on empty, management did the rounds of all the big banks and fund managers in an attempt to sell enough cheap equity to keep the firm going.

Macleans

Sobeys' Empire

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 14, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

The big brick mansion breaks the gentle curve of the northwestern shore of Nova Scotia. Frank Sobey, the man who built Abercrombie House, lived on and off in the waterfront home until he died in 1985 at the age of 83.

Macleans

Eaton's Goes Bankrupt

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 30, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

It seemed like a simple, last-minute, prenuptial task. Jim Pole and Nicole Pelletier from Thunder Bay, Ont., were to be wed on Aug. 21 in the lush Montreal suburb of Vaudreuil. The day before the big event, they just wanted to pick up the groom's new $1,000 suit. After calling the T. EATON CO.

Macleans

Rogers Cable Apologizes

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on January 16, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

It may well go down as one of the rockiest product launches in the history of Canadian television. On Jan. 1, cable companies across the country began offering their 7.5 million subscribers seven new Canadian-owned specialty channels.

Article

Bonds in Canada

A bond is a tool that businesses, governments and other organizations use to borrow money. More specifically, it is a loan agreement through which the bond issuer (the borrower) agrees to pay the lender a specified amount by a certain date. Bond agreements generally also include interest payments. While the borrower usually pays the lender interest on the loan, bonds sometimes have negative interest, meaning the lender pays interest to hold the bond. Bonds and debt financing are important tools for funding large infrastructure projects and wars. (See Canada Savings Bonds; Victory Loans.)

Article

Cod Moratorium of 1992

On 2 July 1992, the federal government banned cod fishing along Canada’s east coast. This moratorium ended nearly five centuries of cod fishing in Newfoundland and Labrador. Cod had played a central role in the province’s economy and culture.

The aim of the policy was to help restore cod stocks that had been depleted due to overfishing. Today, the cod population remains too low to support a full-scale fishery. For this reason, the ban is still largely in place.

Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

Article

Media Convergence

Media convergence refers to the merging of previously distinct media technologies and platforms through digitization and computer networking. This is also known as technological convergence. Media convergence is also a business strategy whereby communications companies integrate their ownership of different media properties. This is also called media consolidation, media concentration or economic convergence. (See also Media Ownership.)

Article

Assets in Canada

An asset is a useful and desirable thing or quality. The word is most often used in business, financial or accounting contexts. Canada has some of the world’s most impressive physical and natural resources. These resources may be viewed as “national assets.” The concept is also useful in personal finance, as housing is most Canadian families’ largest asset.

Article

Debt in Canada

A debt is something that one owes to another. While debt can take many forms, the term usually refers to money owed. In a Canadian context, debts have become an increasing concern during the past three decades. According to Statistics Canada, at the end of the second quarter of 2020, Canadian non-financial businesses, governments and households owed almost $7.1 trillion in debts. That works out to roughly $186,000 per person. (See also Public Debt.)

Article

Financial Bubbles in Canada

In economics, a bubble refers to a rapid rise in asset prices, to the point that they become disconnected from the fundamental value of the underlying asset. A change in investor behaviour is the most common cause of a bubble. When many investors rush to invest in a new technology or take advantage of low interest rates, for example, the increased demand for the asset can raise the price far above its real worth.

Article

Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project

The Trans Mountain Expansion is a project to build about 980 km of new pipe, most of which will run parallel to the existing Trans Mountain oil pipeline. The new line will carry diluted bitumen, or “dilbit,” from Edmonton, Alberta to Burnaby, British Columbia. The expansion will increase the pipeline route’s overall capacity from 300,000 barrels per day to 890,000 barrels per day.

The project’s first owner, Kinder Morgan Canada, sold it to the Government of Canada in 2018. The Trans Mountain Expansion has been a focus of environmental and economic debates, as well as political conflicts. The $12.6 billion project is now under construction.