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Article

William Howard Rapson

William Howard Rapson, chemical engineer, professor, consultant (b at Toronto 15 Sept 1912). After 12 years of research at the Canadian International Paper Co, Hawkesbury, Ont, he returned to U of T, where he had received his doctorate in chemical engineering in 1941.

Article

Lap-Chee Tsui

 Lap-Chee Tsui, geneticist (b at Shanghai, China 21 Dec 1950). A graduate of the Chinese U of Hong Kong (Bsc 1972) and U of Pittsburgh (PhD 1979), Tsui joined the Research Institute at the Hospital for Sick Children at Toronto as a post-doctoral fellow in genetics during 1981-83.

Article

Michel Sarrazin

Michel Sarrazin, surgeon, physician, naturalist (b at Nuits-sous-Beaune, France 5 Sept 1659; d at Québec C 8 Sept 1734). He came to New France in 1685 and the following year was appointed surgeon-major to the colonial regular troops. He later studied medicine in France for 3 years and returned to Québec in 1697 as king's physician.

Article

Sir Thomas George Roddick

Sir Thomas George Roddick, surgeon, medical administrator, politician (b at Harbour Grace, Nfld 31 July 1846; d at Montréal 20 Feb 1923). A McGill medical graduate, he introduced Joseph Lister's antiseptic system to Montréal in 1877, a system that greatly reduced infections after surgery.

Article

Frederic Henry Sexton

Frederic Henry Sexton, educator, mining engineer (b at New Boston, NH 9 June 1879; d at Wolfville, NS 12 Jan 1955). After serving as an assistant in metallurgy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1901-02, he worked for the General Electric Company as a research chemist and metallurgist.

Article

Octavia Grace Ritchie

Octavia Grace Ritchie, married name England, physician, educator (b at Montréal 16 Jan 1868; d there 1 Feb 1948). Though a brilliant student, she was at first refused admission to McGill, but Principal Sir J.W. DAWSON relented when Donald A. SMITH provided $50,000 for women's education there.

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Boris Peter Stoicheff

Boris Peter Stoicheff, physics professor (b at Bitola, Yugoslavia 1 June 1924). A specialist in spectroscopy, laser physics and nonlinear optics, he is known for his innovative use of lasers. After receiving a PhD from U of T in 1950 he joined the National Research Council of Canada in 1951.

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Wilder Penfield

His studies in 1924 with the Madrid neurohistologist Pio del Rio-Hortega provided him with metallic staining techniques that yielded new information on the glia, the supporting cells of the nervous system.

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Francis John Shepherd

Francis John Shepherd, anatomist, surgeon, dermatologist, medical administrator, art connoisseur and critic (b at Como, Qué 25 Nov 1851; d at Montréal 18 Jan 1929). Shepherd revolutionized the teaching of anatomy at McGill.

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Francis William Schofield

Francis William Schofield, veterinarian, teacher, researcher (b at Rugby, Eng 15 Mar 1889; d at Seoul, S Korea 12 Apr 1970). Schofield joined the faculty of the Ontario Veterinary Coll in 1910. He was a teacher and missionary in Korea 1916-19, and returned there in 1955 at retirement.

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John Jones Ross

John Jones Ross, physician, politician, premier of Québec 1884-87 (b at Ste-Anne-de-la-Pérade, Lower Canada 16 Aug 1833; d there 4 May 1901). A rather dull and uninspiring man, Ross was premier 23 Jan 1884 to 25 Jan 1887.

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Frank Harold Rigler

Frank Harold Rigler, biologist (b at London, Eng 9 June 1928; d at Montréal 26 June 1982). Educated at U of T, in 1957 he returned from postdoctoral study in England to the zoology department there.

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Alfred Savage

Alfred Savage, veterinarian, teacher, researcher (born 10 August 1889 in Montréal, Qc; died 14 January 1970 in Winnipeg).

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Edward Sapir

Edward Sapir, anthropologist, linguist, essayist (born 26 January 1884 in Lauenburg, Germany; died 4 February 1939 in New Haven, Connecticut).

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Hans Selye

His theorizing about a General Adaptation Syndrome, based on much experimentation on rats, provoked much controversy. Briefly put, his model suggests that all stimuli are "stressors" that produce a general response of "stress" in the affected person.