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Toronto Feature: Mimico Creek

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

Toronto Feature: Ward's Island

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

Great Lakes

The Great Lakes occupy bedrock depressions that have been differentially eroded by glacial ice, and their form and location are largely controlled by structural geology.

Article

Oak Island

In 1795, 16-year-old Daniel McGinnis discovered a depression in the ground near a huge oak tree and evidence that a block and tackle had been used there. McGinnis and 2 friends dug at the site, revealing a filled-in shaft with platforms of decayed oak logs at 3 m levels.

Article

Cassiar Mountains

The Cassiar Mountains extend from the Yukon Territory 440 km southeast to the confluence of the Finlay and Fox rivers in north-central BC. Cassiar is thought to derive from KASKA, the name of a native group whose traditional territory lies in the mountains.

Article

Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

Article

Meteors, Meteorites and Impact Craters

The solar system contains many objects smaller than the planets (or their satellites) travelling in individual orbits about the SUN; space between the planets also contains myriad dust grains in the micron size range. Near Earth, dust concentrations are only a few hundred particles per cubic kilometre, but 35 000 to 100 000 t of extraterrestrial material enters the atmosphere annually, swept up by our planet from debris that is in its path or crosses its path.