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Article

George Luther Hatheway

George Luther Hatheway, farmer, lumberman, politician, premier of NB (b at Musquash, NB 4 Aug 1813; d at Fredericton 5 July 1872). Elected in 1850 as Reform MLA for York and defeated in 1857, he was re-elected in 1861 and named chief commissioner of public works by S.L. TILLEY.

Article

Howard Ferguson

George Howard Ferguson, lawyer, Conservative politician, premier of Ontario 1923-30 (b at Kemptville, Ont 18 June 1870; d at Toronto 21 Feb 1946). He personified Ontario in the 1920s: a mix of 19th-century values and 20th-century ambitions.

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Howard Charles Green

Howard Charles Green, lawyer, politician (b at Kaslo, BC 5 Nov 1895; d at Vancouver 26 July 1989). Appointed minister of public works in the first DIEFENBAKER government, Green assumed the Dept of External Affairs portfolio in 1959 after Sidney SMITH's sudden death.

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Howard Graham

Howard Douglas Graham, lawyer, army officer (b at Buffalo, NY 15 July 1898; d at Oakville, Ont 28 Sept 1986). A WWI veteran, having enlisted at age 17, Graham rose to become chief of the general staff 1955-58. He practised law in Trenton, Ont, 1922-39, and was mayor in 1933.

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George Harris Hees

George Harris Hees, politician (b at Toronto 17 June 1910; d there 12 June 1996). One of the DIEFENBAKER ministers who resigned during the February 1963 crisis, Hees was an able and energetic promoter of Canada.

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Adélard Godbout

Joseph-Adélard Godbout, agronomist, professor, leader of the Quebec Liberal Party and premier of Québec (born 24 September 1892 in Saint-Éloi, Québec; died 18 September 1956 in Montréal, Québec).

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Daniel Lionel Hanington

Daniel Lionel Hanington, lawyer, politician, premier of NB (b at Shediac, NB 27 June 1835; d at Dorchester, NB 5 May 1909). Clerk of circuits 1867-70 and a school trustee, he first sat as a Liberal-Conservative MLA for Westmorland in 1870.

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John James Fraser

John James Fraser, lawyer, premier (1878-82) and lieutenant-governor (1893-96) of New Brunswick (b at Miramichi, NB 1 Aug 1829; d in Italy 24 Nov 1896). An outstanding lawyer, in 1865 Fraser won a seat in the provincial legislature as an anti-Confederation candidate.

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The Marquess of Lansdowne, Governor General of Canada

Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, politician and governor general of Canada from 1883 to 1888 (born 14 January 1845 in London, United Kingdom; died 3 June 1927 in Clonmel, Ireland). Lansdowne was the first governor general to travel the entire length of the Canadian Pacific Railway. He also mediated a dispute with the United States concerning fishing rights.

Article

James Bagnall

James Bagnall, printer, publisher, politician, officeholder (b at Shelburne, NS 1783; d at Bedeque, PEI 20 June 1855). The son of New York LOYALISTS, he moved with his parents to Charlottetown as an infant.

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Andrew Bannatyne

Andrew Graham Ballenden Bannatyne, businessman, politician (b on South Ronaldsay, Orkney Is 31 Oct 1829; d at St Paul, Minn 18 May 1889).

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Jeanne Sauvé

Jeanne-Mathilde Sauvé, PC, CC, governor general of Canada 1984-1990, journalist, politician, speaker of the House of Commons (born 26 April 1922 in Prud'homme, Saskatchewan; died 26 January 1993 in Montreal). Sauvé was Canada's first woman to be Speaker of the House of Commons and first woman to serve as governor general.

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Archibald Lampman

Lampman began as a writer in the pages of his college magazine, Rouge et Noir, graduating to the more prestigious pages of The Week, and winning an audience in the major American magazines of the day such as Atlantic Monthly, Harper's and Scribner's.

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Frank McKenna

Frank Joseph McKenna, PC, OC, ONB, lawyer, politician, businessman, diplomat, premier of New Brunswick 1987–97 (born 19 January 1948 in Apohaqui, NB). McKenna became premier in only the second complete election sweep in Canadian history. Once called the "tiny, perfect premier," his decade in office was marked by a heavy focus on job creation. Despite his popularity in Liberal Party circles, he rejected an opportunity to run for the leadership of the federal party, in favour of corporate directorship.

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Bob Edwards

An alcoholic, usually in debt, Edwards moved to Toronto in 1909, then to Montréal, Port Arthur, Ont, and Winnipeg, returning to Calgary in 1911. Unconventional to the end, he supported Prohibition in the referendum of 1916, then won election as an independent in the 1921 provincial elections.