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John Campbell Hamilton-Gordon, Earl of Aberdeen

John Campbell Hamilton-Gordon, 1st Marquess of Aberdeen and Temair, Earl of Aberdeen from 1870 to 1916, governor general of Canada from 1893 to 1898 (born 3 August 1847 in Edinburgh, United Kingdom; died 7 March 1934 in Tarland, United Kingdom). As governor general, the Earl of Aberdeen and his wife, Lady Aberdeen, focused on social welfare and engaging with Canadians of various backgrounds and cultures, setting precedents for the philanthropic initiatives of future governors general. Aberdeen also owned an estate in the Okanagan Valley and pioneered commercial fruit growing in the region.

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John Everett Robbins

John Everett Robbins, educator, diplomat (b at Hampton, Ont 9 Oct 1903; d at Regina 7 Mar 1995). He taught school in Saskatchewan for 3 years before entering U of Man. He later gained a PhD from U of Ottawa.

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Acheson Gosford Irvine

Acheson Gosford Irvine, soldier, police officer, prison warden (b at Québec C 7 Dec 1837; d there 9 Jan 1916). The third commissioner of the NWMP, Irvine's reputation was ruined by the North-West Rebellion.

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Duncan Campbell Scott

Duncan Campbell Scott, poet, writer, civil servant (born 2 August 1862 in Ottawa, ON; died 19 December 1947 in Ottawa, ON). Scott’s complicated legacy encompasses both his work as an acclaimed poet and his role as a controversial public servant. Considered one of the “poets of the Confederation” — a group of English-language poets whose work laid the foundations for a tradition of Canadian poetry — his intense works made use of precise imagery and transitioned smoothly between traditional and modern styles. However, his literary work has arguably been overshadowed by his role as the deputy superintendent of the Department of Indian Affairs. He enforced and expanded residential schools, failed to respond to a tuberculosis epidemic and oversaw a treaty process that many claim robbed Indigenous peoples of land and rights. His oft-quoted goal to “get rid of the Indian problem” became, for many, characteristic of the federal government’s treatment of Indigenous peoples.

Article

James Lorimer Ilsley

James Lorimer Ilsley, jurist, politician (b at Somerset, NS 3 Jan 1894; d at Halifax 14 Jan 1967). Educated at Acadia and Dalhousie, Ilsley practised law until his election to Parliament as a Liberal in 1926.

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Ivan Head

Ivan Leigh Head, public servant (b at Calgary, Alta 28 July 1930). A law graduate of U of A, Head taught law there 1963-67 after stints in private practice and the Dept of External Affairs. In 1967 he served as a constitutional adviser to P.E.

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Grant Devine

Devine was sworn in as premier on 8 May 1982. In 1986 with the support of the rural vote, Devine became the province's first PC premier to win re-election. In office he undertook to reorient Sask toward free enterprise and to attract foreign investment to help diversify the economy.

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Harry William Hays

Harry William Hays, farmer, rancher, businessman, politician (b at Carstairs, Alta 25 Dec 1909; d at Ottawa 4 May 1982). He was mayor of Calgary 1959-63, federal minister of agriculture 1963-65 and senator 1966-82.

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Arnold Heeney

Arnold Danford Patrick Heeney, public servant, diplomat (b at Montréal 5 Apr 1902; d at Ottawa 20 Dec 1970). A clergyman's son, he was educated at the University of Manitoba and Oxford.

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Albert Grey, 4th Earl Grey

Albert Henry George Grey, 4th Earl Grey, governor general of Canada from 1904 to 1911 (born 28 November 1851 in London, United Kingdom; died 29 August 1917 in Howick, Northumberland, United Kingdom). Earl Grey established awards that honour Canadian arts, drama and sports. The Grey Cup is still presented to the winning team of the Canadian Football League championship.

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Albert Johnson, “The Mad Trapper of Rat River”

Albert Johnson, also known as the “Mad Trapper,” outlaw (born circa 1890–1900, place of birth unknown; died 17 February 1932 in Yukon). On 31 December 1931, an RCMP constable investigating a complaint about traplines was shot and seriously wounded by a trapper living west of Fort McPherson, NT. The ensuing manhunt — one of the largest in Canadian history — lasted 48 days and covered 240 km in temperatures averaging -40°C. Before it was over, a second policeman was badly wounded and another killed. The killer, tentatively but never positively identified as Albert Johnson, was so skilled at survival that the police had to employ bush pilot Wilfrid “Wop” May to track him. The Trapper’s extraordinary flight from the police across sub-Arctic terrain in the dead of winter captured the attention of the nation and earned him the title “The Mad Trapper of Rat River.” No motive for Johnson’s crimes has ever been established, and his identity remains a mystery.

This article contains sensitive material that may not be suitable for all audiences.

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Joe Handley

Handley moved to the Northwest Territories in 1985 to assume the position of deputy minister of education with the government of the Northwest Territories.

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Abraham Albert Heaps

Abraham Albert Heaps, labour politician (b at Leeds, England 24 Dec 1885; d at Bournemouth, England 4 Apr 1954). An impoverished English Jew who immigrated to Canada in 1911, Heaps, an upholsterer, became a distinguished parliamentarian as member for Winnipeg North from 1925-40.

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Daniel Grafton Hill

Daniel Grafton Hill, OC, O Ont, human rights specialist, historian, public servant (born 23 November 1923 in Independence, Missouri; died 26 June 2003 in Toronto, ON).

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Gordon Sidney Harrington

Gordon Sidney Harrington, lawyer, politician, premier of NS (b at Halifax 7 Aug 1883; d there 4 July 1943). Educated at Dalhousie (LLB, 1904), Harrington practised law in Glace Bay. After serving in the CEF, 1915-20, he became MLA for Cape Breton Centre 1925-33 and Cape Breton S 1933-37.

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Jean de Lauson

Jean de Lauson, governor of New France 1651-56 (b c 1584; d at Paris, France 16 Feb 1666). Long before coming to the colony as governor, Lauson had enjoyed a close and lucrative connection with Canada.

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