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Article

Alexander Rankin

Alexander Rankin, timber merchant, politician (b in parish of Mearns, Scot 31 Dec 1788; d at Liverpool, Eng 3 Apr 1852). Rankin became a clerk in the firm of Pollok, Gilmour and Co, Glasgow merchants who traded with the Baltic ports.

Article

Elias Hardy

Elias Hardy, lawyer, politician (b at Farnham, Surrey, Eng c 1744; d at Saint John 25 Dec 1798). Hardy immigrated to Virginia in 1775; like most LOYALISTS he sympathized with America in its quarrel with Britain but opposed the ultimate solution of colonial independence.

Article

Hilary M. Weston

Hilary M. Weston, philanthropist, businesswoman, lieutenant-governor of ONTARIO from 1997 to 2002 (b in Dublin, Ireland, 12 Jan 1942). Born Hilary Frayne, she grew up in Dublin, Ireland and is the eldest of five children. In 1966, she married Galen Weston and had two children, Alannah and Galen.

Article

Stockwell Day Jr.

During the next three years, Day also became a prominent figure in efforts to transform the REFORM PARTY OF CANADA into a broader conservative alliance to defeat the federal LIBERAL PARTY.

Article

Gregor Robertson

Gregor Robertson, politician, entrepreneur, MLA, mayor of Vancouver (2008–18) (born 18 September 1964 in North Vancouver, BC). Robertson served as the 39th mayor of Vancouver for ten years, the longest consecutive term in Vancouver’s history. He won three consecutive terms in 2008, 2011 and 2014. During his time as mayor, he helped to create and implement the Greenest City 2020 Action Plan while facing many challenges, including rising housing costs, homelessness and Vancouver’s opioid crisis.

Article

Pierre Elliott Trudeau

Pierre Elliott Trudeau, PC, CC, CH, FRSC, prime minister of Canada 1968–79 and 1980–84, politician, writer, constitutional lawyer (born 18 October 1919 in Montreal, QC; died 28 September 2000 in Montreal). A charismatic and controversial figure, Pierre Trudeau was arguably Canada’s best-known politician, both at home and abroad. He introduced legal reforms in his quest to make Canada a more “just society,” and made Canada officially bilingual with the Official Languages Act of 1969. He negotiated Canada’s constitutional independence from Britain and established a new Canadian Constitution with an entrenched Charter of Rights and Freedoms. He played an important role in defeating the Quebec separatist movement of the 1970s and 1980s; although his decision to invoke the War Measures Act in response to the 1970 October Crisis drew sharp criticism. His federalist stance as well as his language and economic policies alienated many in Canada; particularly in the West. His eldest son, Justin Trudeau, became leader of the Liberal Party in 2013 and prime minister in 2015.

Article

Alexander Edmund Batson Davie

Alexander Edmund Batson Davie, lawyer, politician, premier of British Columbia 1887-89 (b at Wells, Eng 24 Nov 1847; d at Victoria 1 Aug 1889). He immigrated to Vancouver Island in 1862 and was the first person to receive a complete legal education there, being called to the bar in 1873.

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Harry William Hays

Harry William Hays, farmer, rancher, businessman, politician (b at Carstairs, Alta 25 Dec 1909; d at Ottawa 4 May 1982). He was mayor of Calgary 1959-63, federal minister of agriculture 1963-65 and senator 1966-82.

Article

John Reeves

John Reeves, judge (b probably at London, Eng c 1752/53; d there 7 Aug 1829). He studied at Oxford and was called to the bar in 1779.

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Byron Ingemar Johnson

Byron Ingemar Johnson, "Boss," businessman, politician, premier of BC 1947-52 (b at Victoria 10 Dec 1890; d there 12 Jan 1964). After service in WWI, Johnson and his brothers formed a building supply company in Victoria. Elected as a Liberal in Victoria in 1933, he was defeated in 1937.

Article

George Brown

George Brown, journalist, politician (born 29 November 1818 in Alloa, Scotland; died 9 May 1880 in Toronto, ON).

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David Dingwall (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on April 3, 1995. Partner content is not updated.

Forget, for a moment, his reputation as a throwback to the old-style, intensely partisan Ottawa wheeler-dealers. At a little past 8 a.m. on a steel-grey morning, David Dingwall is trying to lighten up. It does not come easily.

Article

Sir Charles Tupper

Sir Charles Tupper, prime minister, premier of Nova Scotia 1864–67, doctor (born 2 July 1821 in Amherst, NS; died 30 October 1915 in Bexleyheath, England). Charles Tupper led Nova Scotia into Confederation while he was premier. Over the course of his lengthy political career, he served as a federal Cabinet minister and diplomat, and briefly as prime minister of Canada — his 10-week term is the shortest in Canadian history. He was the last surviving Father of Confederation.

Article

Jacques Parizeau

Jacques Parizeau, GOQ, economist, professor, senior public servant, politician and premier of Québec (born 9 August 1930 in Montréal, QC; died 1 June 2015 in Montréal, QC).

Article

Eden Colvile

Eden Colvile, governor of Rupert's Land (b 1819; d in Devonshire, Eng 2 Apr 1893), son of the deputy governor of the Hudson's Bay Company.