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Macleans

Clark to Become Tory Leader

There is not much Canadians don’t know about Joe Clark by now. He is an eternal optimist to some, a punching bag for others, and that combination has set him up for some of the more humiliating political defeats of his generation.

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Bessie Starkman

Besha (Bessie) Starkman (Perri), organized crime boss (born 14 April 1889 or 21 June 1890 in Poland; died 13 August 1930 in Hamilton, ON). During the Prohibition era she became known as Canada’s first high-profile female crime boss. With her common-law spouse, mobster Rocco Perri, she ran a bootlegging and drug-smuggling enterprise. Starkman was gunned down in the garage of her home and her murderers were never caught. Her funeral was one of the largest ever seen in Hamilton.

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Helen Gregory MacGill

Helen Gregory MacGill, judge, journalist, musician (born 7 January 1864 in Hamilton, Canada West; died 27 February 1947 in Chicago, Illinois). Helen Gregory MacGill was a pioneering journalist, feminist and judge. She was the first woman to graduate from Trinity College (now the University of Toronto), as well as the first woman judge in British Columbia, where she served on the juvenile court for 23 years. Her daughter, Elsie MacGill, became the world’s first female aeronautical engineer and aircraft designer.

Macleans

Preston Manning (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on September 22, 1997. Partner content is not updated.

The view from Reform party headquarters in Calgary is of the Canadian Rockies, but inside the sixth-floor conference room the words are from Virginia, courtesy of Thomas Jefferson.

Macleans

Hurricane Carter Saga

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on December 6, 1999. Partner content is not updated.

He was down for the count. Rubin (Hurricane) Carter had been in prison for 13 years, serving a life sentence for a triple murder he did not commit - a brutal slaying at a bar in Paterson, N.J., in 1966.

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Queen Elizabeth II

Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada, the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms (born 21 April 1926 in London, United Kingdom). The Queen has reigned since 1952 and is the Head of State of Canada, the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms. Elizabeth II was the first monarch to be crowned Queen of Canada. She is the longest reigning monarch in British and Commonwealth history.

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James Dunsmuir

Dunsmuir withstood all attempts at unionizing his operations, becoming labour's chief target in western Canada. In 1905 he sold the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway to the CPR and in 1910 he sold his collieries to William MACKENZIE and Donald MANN for $10 million.

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Howard Pawley

Pawley led his party to victory in the Nov 1981 and March 1986 elections. The most controversial action by the Pawley government during its first term was the introduction of a resolution entrenching French language rights.

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John Norquay

The Norquay government successfully extended Manitoba's boundaries and secured larger federal subsidies, but it eventually foundered upon Canada's railway policy. Caught between PM John A.

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Roméo Dallaire

Roméo Dallaire, soldier, advocate, senator 2005-2014 (born 25 June 1946 in Denekamp, the Netherlands). Roméo Dallaire served with distinction in the Canadian Forces and was so affected by his experiences that he became an advocate for the world's victims of genocide, particularly in Africa.

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Prince Philip (HRH The Duke of Edinburgh)

His Royal Highness (HRH) The Duke of Edinburgh (Prince Philip), consort of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, the United Kingdom and 14 other Commonwealth realms (born 10 June 1921 in Corfu, Greece; died 9 April 2021). Philip was the longest-serving royal consort in British and Commonwealth history. Philip founded The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, which fosters the personal growth of young people around the world.

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Commissioner of Official Languages

Canada’s Commissioner of Official Languages ensures that the Official Languages Act (adopted in 1969, amended in 1988 and 2005) is followed within the federal government and the Parliament of Canada. The Commissioner also ensures that both of Canada’s official languages, English and French, are recognized as having equal status in accordance with Canada’s language policy.

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Persons Case

The Persons Case (Edwards v. A.G. of Canada) was a constitutional ruling that established the right of women to be appointed to the Senate. The case was initiated by the Famous Five, a group of prominent women activists. In 1928, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that women were not “persons” according to the British North America Act (now called the Constitution Act, 1867). Therefore, they were ineligible for appointment to the Senate. However, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council reversed the Court’s decision on 18 October 1929. The Persons Case enabled women to work for change in both the House of Commons and the Senate. It also meant that women could no longer be denied rights based on a narrow interpretation of the law.

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William Lyon Mackenzie King

William Lyon Mackenzie King, prime minister of Canada 1921–26, 1926–30 and 1935–48 (born 17 December 1874 in Berlin [Kitchener], ON; died 22 July 1950 in Kingsmere, QC). William Lyon Mackenzie King was the dominant political figure in an era of major changes. He was leader of the Liberal Party from 1919 to 1948, and Prime Minister of Canada for almost 22 of those years. King was Canada’s longest-serving prime minister. He steered Canada through industrialization, much of the Great Depression, and the Second World War. By the time he left office, Canada had achieved greater independence from Britain and a stronger international voice. It had also implemented policies such as employment insurance.

Macleans

Filmon Re-elected

Maybe Manitoba was always immune to the trend. Or perhaps the wave of anti-status quo, throw-the-bums-out sentiment that has swept North America - obliterating the federal Conservatives in the 1993 election and congressional Democrats in the United States last fall - is finally beginning to ebb.

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Finta Case

In its first decision relating to the Finta war crimes case (1993), the Supreme Court of Canada permitted 3 interested groups to intervene - the Human Rights League of B'nai B'rith Canada, the Canadian Jewish Congress and InterAmicus.

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Willie Adams

Willie Adams, Inuk, Liberal senator, businessman, electrician (born 22 June 1934 in Kuujjuaq [then Fort Chimo] in Nunavik, Quebec). As Canada’s first Inuit senator, Adams frequently sought greater federal government support for his people in education, health care, infrastructure, land claims, fishery allocations and affordable food, housing and fuel. He was actively involved in the creation of Nunavut and supported Inuit language rights, art and culture, and traditional hunting methods such as sealing.